Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Some cool mould manufacturing factory images:

Image from page 47 of “Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects” (1891)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: rubberhandstamps01sloa
Title: Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Sloane, T. O’Conor (Thomas O’Conor), 1851-1940
Subjects: Hand stamps Rubber
Publisher: New York, N. W. Henley & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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anized product. Sheet rubber is made as above;is vulcanized by some of the absorption processesdescribed in the chapter on vulcaniza-tion. We now come to the second product: regularlymixed and cured rubber. Its starting point isthe washed India rubber from the washer andsheeter. We have seen that the ^^ure gum or caoutchouc isvery sensitive to changes of temperature. At thefreezing point of water it is hard and rigid, and at 42 RUBBER HAND STAMP MAKING the boiling point is like putty in consistency.There are several substances wliich can be made tocombine with the gum and which remove from itthis susceptibility to change of temperature. Theprocess of effecting this combination is called vul-canization, and the product is called vulcanizedindia rubber. Sulphur is the agent most generallyemployed. In the factory the normal vulcanization is carriedout in two steps, mixing and curing. The washedsheet india rubber which has not been masticatedand which must be perfectly dry is the starting

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Making i^Iixed Ritbber. point, andtlie mixing rolls sliown in the cuts are themechanism for carrying out the first step. Theseare a pair of powerful rollers which are geared so asto work like ordinary rolls, except that one revolves AND THE MANIPULATION OF RUBBER. 43 about three times as fast as the other. They areheated by steam, which is introduced inside ofthem. The sheet is first passed through them afew times to secure its softness, and then the opera-tive begins to sprinkle sulphur upon it as it entersthe rolls. This is continued, the rubber passing andrepassing until perfect incorporation is secured.About ten per cent, of sulphur is added, and a work-man can take care of thirty pounds at a time. This material is incompletely vulcanized. It isin its present condition very amenable to heat andis ready for any moulding process. Generally it isrolled out or ^^ calendered into sheets of differentthickness from which articles are made in mouldsby curing. These sheets are of especial

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Image from page 413 of “Canadian foundryman (1921)” (1921)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: canfoundryman1921toro
Title: Canadian foundryman (1921)
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Foundries Foundry workers
Publisher: Toronto : MacLean Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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supplies.Our lines com-prise the highestgrade equipmentobtainable any-where. You Cant Afford to Overlook theseMoney Saving Opportunities We are offering you at prices beyond comparison the high-est grade Foundry Equipment obtainable anywhere. If youare wide awake for real values investigate these lines. Get Our Prices on Ladle Bowls and Shanks.Steel Bands Steel Slip-over Jackets.Steel Core Plates.Wooden Snap Flasks. Youll find longer servicein our flat bottom steelladle bowls. These bowlscome in capacities from 50to 800 lbs. Dont shove this oppor-tunity aside. Write atonce for Prices and liberalDiscounts. All Steel Core Ovens Thes* core ovens have nocast parts to break. Extrasmoke pipe connection takesexcess smoke away. Alldoors have Battle Plate toreduce heat loss when door isopen. pAMP pROS Tote Box, Barrels, etc.All-Steel Core Ovens. Manufacturing and Welding Co. We can supply AluminumPattern Plates in any size. 825 DUPONT STREET, TORONTO, ONTARIO 26 CANADIAN FOUNDRYMAN Volume XII

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Heres the history of this jobin a jobbing foundry beforeand after machine-moulding:- Weight, 275 pounds.Flask (inside). 42 x 33 x 24 high. Before Mounting—One man put up4 moulds in 7 hours After Mounting— 4 men and one No. machine put up 45 moulds in 7 hours. 435 Labor Required For moulding, coring, closingand pouring each moudBefore—2V* man-hours.After—8-10ths man-hrs. Cost of Mounting Pattern,including labor andmaterials, .00. Labor Cost reduced 62 M: /<. Cost of Pattern Mounting saved on the first 28moulds. Reducing costs to meet1921 requirements J7CONOMY in productionis the keynote of 1921 man-ufacturing and selling prob-lems. Extravagant produc-tion costs can no longer bepassed on to a helpless con-sumer. Machine-molding must be util-ized wherever possible in orderthat selling prices will seemreasonable to buyers.The Osborn Manufacturing Company INCORPORATED Main Office and Factory 5401 Hamilton Ave. Cleveland, Ohio New York San Francisco

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Cool Moldings Equipment China images

Cool Moldings Equipment China images

Check out these moldings equipment china images:

Image from page 349 of “How to paint : an instruction book with full description of all the materials necessary.” (1894)
moldings equipment china
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Identifier: howtopaintinstru00asal
Title: How to paint : an instruction book with full description of all the materials necessary.
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: A.S. Aloe Company.
Subjects: Artists’ materials–Catalogs Painting–Technique Fountain pens–Catalogs Pyrography–Equipment and supplies–Catalogs China painting–Equipment and supplies–Catalogs Trade catalogs–Artists’ materials Trade catalogs–Fountain pens Trade catalogs–Pyrography–Equipment and supplies Trade catalogs–China painting–Equipment and supplies.
Publisher: A.S. Aloe Company, St. Louis
Contributing Library: Winterthur Museum Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Color Preservingf Medium Indelible Fabric Paintingr The only Medium yet discovered by wliichpainting with oil colors can be done on silk,linen or cotton cloth, rendering the fabric softand pliable and 3et indelible and unfadingwhen laundered. Useful in decorating dresses,bed spreads and shams, curtains, draperies,table linen, dojlies, etc. If in place of turpentine the Medium isused in painting on bolting cloth, the workwill be transparent, yet unfading, and canbe easily washed. Each bottle contains 4 ozs.and will paint a large amount of surface. BERLIN CHEMICAL CO., Mgrs.. BERLIN, WIS. H. A. HYATT, MANUFACTURER, IMPORTER ANDDEALER IN Photographic Supplies, ARTISTS MATERIALS. PICTURE FRAMES, MOULDINGS,ALBUMS, ETC. N. E. Cor. Eighth and Locust Streets, St. Louis, Mo.

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Family Medicine Chest, S5.OO. It contains thirty vials, two drachms each,of the principal remedies, such as are usedin simple cases of Colds, Coughs, Headache,Diarrhoea, Childrens Troubles, etc. The J2.00 Case contains twelve vials, twodrachms each, including a Practical Guide toHomoeopathy. The 1^1.00 Case contains twelve vials, onedrachm each. Libera! Discount to Physicians and Druggists. FOR SALE BY HENRY R. LUYTIES, Manufacturing Homceopathic Druggist, 2i8 Pine Street, ST. LOUIS, MO. HOW TO PAINT. 343

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Cool Mold Products images

Cool Mold Products images

A few nice mold products images I found:

Two free splicing blocks with each reel!
mold products
Image by Carbon Arc
Kodak 7-inch (17.8cm) tape reel, early 1960s. Along their well-known photographic and motion-picture products, Eastman Kodak also manufactured recording tape and tape reels.

One distinguishing feature of their tape reels was a splicing block molded into each side of the reel. Using special splicing tape and a single-edged razor blade according to instructions printed inside the box, hobbyists could splice their own tape the same way professionals did.

Cool Mold Chinese images

Cool Mold Chinese images

A few nice mold chinese images I found:

2016 – China – Beijing – Cloisonné – 1 of 5
mold chinese
Image by Ted’s photos – For Me & You
After we left the Badaling Great Wall we went to a cloisonné factory, shop and restaurant for lunch. After lunch we wandered around the shop and factory.

Cloisonné is colourful handicraft articles made by a complex manufacturing process. It includes inlaying thin gold threads or copper wires into various patterns, hammering the base, inlaying copper strips, soldering, filling with enamel, firing the enamel, polishing, gilding and adhering enamels of various colors to copper molds.

Introduced into the Middle Kingdom in the 13th century, this technique became a typically Chinese art. The technique remains common in China to the present day

Jardin Royal Chinese Restaurant Newbridge – County Kildare (Ireland)
mold chinese
Image by infomatique
Newbridge is a town in County Kildare, Ireland. Its population of 21,561 (2011 Census) making it the largest town in County Kildare and the 15th. largest in Ireland.

The town is located on the banks of the River Liffey, which provides a range of natural amenities. Upriver are towns such as Athgarvan, Kilcullen and Blessington, while downriver are the towns of Caragh, Clane and Celbridge.

Newbridge is bounded by the Curragh Plains to the west, Pollardstown Fen and the Bog of Allen and Moulds Bog to the north west. Around the Curragh, and to the east are many important stud farms.

To the south the motorway now forms a boundary to the town.

Today Newbridge is a thriving town with a population approaching 21,661, a major centre for industry and commerce, within the South Kildare region.

Cool Pipe Fitting Moulding Design images

Cool Pipe Fitting Moulding Design images

A few nice pipe fitting moulding design images I found:

Image from page 48 of “Morton memorial; a history of the Stevens institute of technology, with biographies of the trustees, faculty, and alumni, and a record of the achievements of the Stevens family of engineers” (1905)
pipe fitting moulding design
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: mortonmemorialhi00furm
Title: Morton memorial; a history of the Stevens institute of technology, with biographies of the trustees, faculty, and alumni, and a record of the achievements of the Stevens family of engineers
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: Furman, Franklin De Ronde, 1870- ed
Subjects: Stevens family Morton, Henry, 1836-1902 Stevens Institute of Technology
Publisher: Hoboken, N.J., Stevens institute of technology
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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For a number of years previous to 1881 the shop-work course was arrangedso that, after a prescribed set of exercises in carpenter-work and wood-turning,millwrighting and steam-fitting, machinist-work, blacksmithing, molding, found-ing, and pattern-making had been performed by a class, the students were permit-ted to complete the course by constructing some machine. Thus the Class of 1876 built a Thurston autographic testing-machine. GROWTH OF THE INSTITUTE 19 several important features of the design having been previously planned in thedrawing-room. The Class of 1877 built a lubricant testing-machine. A part of the Class of 1878 assisted in the design and construction of alarge oil-tester, while other portions of the class designed and constructed a Pronydynamometer, a small horizontal engine, and a small oscillating engine. The Class of 1879 built an autographic transmitting dynamometer. The Class of 1880 assisted in the construction of a 3 V2-horse-power com-pound condensing engine.

Text Appearing After Image:
Ground Floor of the Carnegie Laboratory of Engineering The construction of a machine as a final exercise in the shop was there-after discontinued. Subsequent classes devoted the time which had been sospent to the performance of more extended series of exercises in the variousbranches of the shop course. About the time this change took effect, the shop course was also consid-erably extended, and a course in experimental mechanics inaugurated. This course included, as then planned, a series of sixteen experimentalexercises comprising, among others, a test of the evaporative power of boilers; 20 THE STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY experimental determination of the total heat of combustion of coal used in boilertests, and comparison of this heat with that computed from the analysis of thecoal; measurement of the friction of steam flowing through pipes; comparison ofefficiency of steam pump and injector. Order of Exercises in Experimental Mechanics, Class of 1902 Supplementary Term, June a

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Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Check out these mould manufacturing factory images:

Mould making/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts/CNC Precision Parts Manufacturing与您共享了 相册。
mould manufacturing factory
Image by ccrweb
Dear Sir/Ms,

Good day!
As an ISO certified factory, we specialized manufacture Mould making/ Sheet
metal process/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts, with
strong competitive price and excellent quality, for more than 20 years.
Any questions and enquiries will be highly regarded. Just email us the
drawing and detailed requirement, you will get a complete quotation with
technical analysis within 24 hours.

Your prompt reply is highly appreciated.

Best regards sincerely!

Michael

Cool Plastic Molded Part images

Cool Plastic Molded Part images

A few nice plastic molded part images I found:

Printing the past: 3-D archaeology and the first Americans
plastic molded part
Image by BLMOregon
Photos were captured at the Pacific Slope Archaeological Laboratory on the Oregon State University Campus in Corvallis, Dec. 13, 2016, to accompany the feature story below: "Printing the past: 3-D archaeology and the first Americans." Article online here (and below): goo.gl/viKEZF

Photo by Matt Christenson, BLM
Story by Toshio Suzuki, BLM

—————————————-

For the first Americans, and the study of them today, it all starts with a point.

A sharp point fastened to a wooden shaft gave the hunter 13,000 years ago a weapon that could single-handedly spear a fish or work in numbers to take down a mammoth.

For a prehistoric human, these points were the difference between life and death. They were hunger-driven, handmade labors of love that took hours to craft using a cacophony of rock-on-rock cracks, thuds and shatters.

They have been called the first American invention, and some archaeologists now think 3-D scanning points can reveal more information about both the technology and the people.

The Pacific Slope Archaeological Laboratory at Oregon State University takes up only a few rooms on the ground floor of Waldo Hall, one of the supposedly haunted buildings on campus.

There are boxes of cultural history everywhere, and floor-to-ceiling wood cabinets with skinny pull-out drawers housing even more assets, but the really good stuff, evidence of the earliest known cultures in North America, lives in an 800-pound gun safe.

Loren Davis, anthropology professor at OSU and director of the lab, thinks 3-D scanning, printing, and publishing can circumvent the old traditions of the field, that artifacts are only to be experienced in museums and only handled by those who have a Ph.D.

“We are reimagining the idea of doing archaeology in a 21st century digital way,” said Davis. “We don’t do it just to make pretty pictures or print in plastic, we mostly want to capture and share it for analysis,” he added.

Nearby in the L-shaped lab, one of his doctoral students is preparing to scan a point that was discovered on Bureau of Land Management public lands in southeast Oregon.

Thousands of points have been unearthed since the 1930s in North America, the first being in eastern New Mexico near a town called Clovis. That name is now known worldwide as representing the continent’s first native people.

More recently, though, other peoples with distinctive points were found elsewhere, and some researchers think it means there was differing technology being made at the same time, if not pre-Clovis.

One such location is the Paisley Caves in southern Oregon ― one of the many archaeologically significant sites managed by the BLM.

The earliest stem point from Paisley Caves was scanned at Davis’ lab and a 3-D PDF was included in a 2012 multi-authored report in the journal Science.

Davis estimates his lab at OSU has scanned as many as 400 points, including others from BLM-managed lands in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington.

More scans would mean a bigger database for comparing points and determining what style they are.

“Ideally, we want to get as many artifacts scanned as possible,“ said Davis. “The BLM offers a lot of access to public data ― this is just another way of doing it.”

Transforming a brittle piece of volcanic glass, by hand, into a beautiful and deadly 4-inch-long spear point is a process.

In one hand would be a hard shaping rock, or maybe a thick section of antler, and in the other would be the starter stone, which in addition to igneous could be jasper, chert, or any other chippable rock that creates a hide-puncturing level of sharpness.

After what might be hundreds of controlled strokes and rock rotations, the rough shape of a lance or spear tip would take form. Discarded shards of stone would often result in more points, or other useful tools like scrapers and needles.

Clovis points are distinguished by their length, bifacial leaf shape and middle channels on the bottom called flutes. Eventually the repetitive flaking of the point would stop, and the hunter would use precise pressure points to create the flute on one or each side that likely helped slot the finished product into a spear-like wooden pole.

The hunter was now mobile and ready to roam.

Prior to 3-D scanning, OSU doctoral student Sean Carroll picks up a can of Tinactin, gives it the obligatory shake, and completely covers “one of the oldest technologies in North America” with antifungal spray.

The talc and alcohol from the athlete’s foot remedy helps the software see even the slightest indents in the point, and it rubs right off afterwards.

“I want to scan all the Clovis I can get my hands on,” said Carroll, who came to OSU because of Davis’ 3-D lab and is using the medium as a big part of his dissertation.

Two random items, a power plug adapter and a ball of clay, are placed on each side of the fluted point to give the camera and light projector perspective. The objects create margins that force the structured light patterns to bend and capture more of the point’s surface detail.

Even so, like the hunter rotating the shaping rock, the archaeologist has to rotate the foam square holding the three items. Each scan takes about six seconds.

Carroll and Davis estimate that the learning curve for this process was about 100 hours. One hundred hours of trial and error — and a lot of watching YouTube videos — for a finished product that they think is indisputably worth it.

A completed 3-D scan of a point will have about 40,000 data points per square inch. The measurements are so precise, they can determine the difference between flake marks as thin as a piece of paper.

Davis says no archaeologist with a pair of calipers can come close to measuring the data obtained via 3-D, because simply, “there are some jobs that robots are really good at.”

“If the end game is measurements, well you could spend your whole life with a pair of calipers trying to achieve what we can do in 10 minutes,” said Davis.

Last year, the famous human relative nicknamed Lucy had 3-D scans of her 3.2 million year old bones published in the journal Nature.

In 2015, archaeologists from Harvard University completed a 3-D scan of a winged and human-headed stone bull from Mesopotamia that stands 13 feet high at the Louvre Museum.

And the Smithsonian Institution is currently beta testing a website dedicated to publishing 3-D models from its massive collection, including molds of President Abraham Lincoln’s face and the entire Apollo 11 command module.

All of these new-school efforts are based upon the old-school scientific principles of preservation and promotion.

Rock points, fossils, hieroglyphics — various forms of cultural assets are susceptible to environmental conditions and not guaranteed to be around forever. Three-dimensional scanning is the most accurate way to digitally preserve these items of merit.

Once accurate preservation is done, there are opportunities for promoting not just science, but specific research goals.

In the case of the Lucy bones, scientists hope that crowdsourcing the 3-D data will help get more experts to look at the fossils and prove that the tree-dwelling ape died from a fall.

When it comes to comparing one specific stemmed point to an entire hard drive of scanning data, BLM archaeologist Scott Thomas thinks the work being done at the OSU lab can move archaeology to a new level.

“The 3-D scanning method blows anything we have done out of the water,” said Thomas.

That ability to compare points can lead to insights on how these hunting tools moved over geography, and even expand theories about how native groups learned new technologies.

“It’s going to be a really powerful tool someday — not too far off,” said Thomas.

While long-term data analysis may not be the sexiest form of archaeology, holding a 3-D printed stem point is a pretty cool educational tool.

Davis of OSU has incorporated 3-D prints into his classes and said his students are able to make a tactile connection with artifacts that otherwise are not available.

“The students really enjoy these printed and digital models and often say that they are almost like the real thing,” said Davis.

This spring, Davis is traveling to Magadan, Russia — aka Siberia — to inspect and scan some points that may be linked to Clovis peoples.

The goal in Siberia, of course, is to further expand the 3-D database. He is specifically interested in comparing them to stems from a BLM-managed site he excavated in Idaho called Cooper’s Ferry.

As his student, Carroll, begins to clean up and put the scanned points into their individually labeled ziplocked bags, Davis can’t help but mention how much easier international research could be with 3-D scanning.

“You can share cultural resource info with people in other countries and you don’t have to come visit,” he said, adding that Russia isn’t the easiest country to enter.

“It’s as easy as sending an email,” Carroll agreed.

Davis then mentioned his 11-year-old child and how much of school curriculum these days is web-based as opposed to text-based.

“There’s nothing wrong with books, I’m a huge fan of books, but it’s a different way of learning,” said the archaeology professor.

And with that, he made another point.

— by Toshio Suzuki, tsuzuki@blm.gov, @toshjohn

Best places to find 3-D archaeology online:
— Sketchfab.com is one of the biggest databases on the web for 3-D models of cultural assets. Institutions and academics alike are moving priceless treasures to the digital space for all to inspect. Two examples: via the British Museum, a 7.25-ton statue of Ramesses II is available for viewing and free download; and via archaeologist Robert Selden Jr., hundreds of 3-D models are open to the public for study, including several Clovis points from the Blackwater Draw National Historic Site in New Mexico.
— The Smithsonian Institution is bringing the best of American history to a new audience via their 3-D website (3d.si.edu). Amelia Earhart’s flight suit? Check. Native American ceremonial killer whale hat? Check. Face cast of President Abraham Lincoln? Check and check — there are two. And their biggest 3-D scan is still coming: the 184-foot-long space shuttle Discovery.
— Visitors to Africanfossils.org can filter 3-D model searches by hominids, animals and tools, and also by date, from zero to 25 million years ago.
The sleek website, with partners like National Geographic and the National Museums of Kenya, makes it easy to download or share 3-D scans, and each item even comes with a discovery backstory and Google map pinpointing exactly where it was found.

Cool China Household Molds images

Cool China Household Molds images

A few nice china household molds images I found:

Image from page 96 of “Health in home and town” (1912)
china household molds
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: healthinhometow00brow
Title: Health in home and town
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, Bertha Millard, b. 1870
Subjects: Sanitation, Household Public health
Publisher: Boston, D.C. Heath
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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s just under the ceiling, called the cornice. Thefrieze varies in width, and may be nine inches or moredeep. It is sometimes finished at the base with a widemolding for the display of china or pottery. In smallrooms, the walls seem higher when the frieze is omittedand the picture-molding is placed close to the ceiling.The filling is the space from the top of the dado or thebase-board to the frieze or the molding. This is thepart that stands directly back of the furniture andpictures. The Wall Coverings. — The appearance of the walldepends upon three things: first, the manner of cover-ing; second, the color chosen; and third, the patternselected. There are several ways in which walls are HOW TO FINISH AND DECORATE HOUSE 85 decorated. Some of the most beautiful walls are coveredwith panels of wood. Mahogany, oak, and otherbeautiful woods are used for this purpose, and are sofinished as to bring out their wonderful grain and color.This is very costly, but some of the museums show rooms

Text Appearing After Image:
••■ . -a ,^r~ -.

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Cool China Plastic Molding images

Cool China Plastic Molding images

Some cool china plastic molding images:

“Book city”
china plastic molding
Image by ttstam
one of the few bookstores in Shenzhen. This one specializes in design and engineering books. The entire lower floor is dedicated to engineering books, from CAD/CAM, plastic design, product design, mold design, to obscure tomes on implimenting TCP/IP on an atmel microprocessor.

Most books are US to … more than reasonable. I have to start learning how to read simplified Chinese.

And you wonder why China is closing the technological gap with the US so quickly…

dining_room_01
china plastic molding
Image by markomni
This is our new dining room set. There is still plastic wrap on the china cabinet’s hardware, and I still need to install the crown molding, but otherwise the dining room is setup as we would normally have it.

Cool China Foam Mould images

Cool China Foam Mould images

Some cool china foam mould images:

Image from page 13 of “China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire” (1843)
china foam mould
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: chinainseriesofv3to4allo
Title: China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire
Year: 1843 (1840s)
Authors: Allom, Thomas, 1804-1872 Wright, G. N. (George Newenham), 1790?-1877, editor Fisher, Son, & Co., publisher
Subjects:
Publisher: London, Newgate Street Paris, rue St. Honoré : Fisher, Son, & Co.
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

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-, from the Outer Harbour 56 A Marriage Procession 58 Landing-place at tlie Yuk-shan ……….. 60 Silk Farms at Iloo-chow ………… 61 A Devotee consulting the Sticks of Fate 64 Great Temple at Honan 66 The Emperor Taou-kwang reviewing his Guard? …….. 67

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4 ^ -^ ^ -^ CHINA. THE WOO-TANG MOUNTAINS. PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI. The wild streams leap with headlong sweep,In their ciirbless course oer the mountain steep :All fresh and strong they foam along,Waking the rocks with their cataract song. The Recluse or the Rock. In the schistose district of the Meilung mountains, that engross the southern part ofKiang-si, the forms of the cliffs and the crags are more varied than art could ever havemade them, and than nature generally does. The goddess, however, in a sportive mood,seems to have moulded the amazingly diversified surface of the Woo-tang rocks, inwhich the Kan-kiang-ho has its source; for, the toppling position of the great mass thatoverhangs the village of Woo-tang and the vale of Nan-kang-foo, is obedient ratherto the strength of adhesion than the laws of gravit). An Alpine grandeur pervadesthe whole mountain chain to the north of the Meilung group; and the Chinese are soentirely devoted to pleasure, so much engrossed by superstition, s

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