Nice Tooling Factory photos

Nice Tooling Factory photos

Some cool tooling factory images:

SLS Core Stage Production Continues for Rocket’s First Flight
tooling factory
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Throughout NASA’s 43-acre rocket factory, the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, engineers are building all five parts of the Space Launch System’s core stage. For the first SLS flight for deep space exploration with NASA’s Orion spacecraft, major structural manufacturing is complete on three parts: the forward skirt, the intertank and the engine section. Test articles, which are structurally similar to flight hardware, and are used to qualify the core stage for flight, are in various stages of production and testing.

“One of the most challenging parts of building the world’s most powerful rocket has been making the largest rocket stage ever manufactured for the first time,” said Steve Doering, the SLS stages manager at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “The 212-foot-tall core stage is a new design made with innovative welding tools and techniques.”

To build the rocket’s fuel tanks, Boeing, the prime contractor for the SLS core stage, is joining some of the thickest parts ever built with self-reacting friction stir welding. NASA and Boeing engineers and materials scientists have scrutinized the weld confidence articles and developed new weld parameters for making the liquid oxygen and hydrogen tanks for the first SLS mission.

Image Credit: NASA/MSFC Michoud image: Judy Guidry

Read more

For more information about the Space Launch System

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Crystal Mill
tooling factory
Image by Road Fun
Definitely a shot from the archive, this was originally a color slide taken when I was a child using a very simple camera. It may have been a Brownie. This and a couple of other slides were found amongst my mom’s belongings and I had them scanned to a CD. Originally in color, I feel this shot works better processed into sepia. At the time I felt the Mill was a very precarious structure but it seems it still stands today. This was not an easy place to visit and required some off roading in a rented Jeep. My father died when I was young and the fishing trip we took to Colorado one summer was the only major father-son event we got to enjoy together. A treasured memory forever.

According to Wikipedia:
The Crystal Mill, or the Old Mill in Crystal, Colorado in the United States, was actually not a mill in the sense of being a factory, but was instead a power generating station.
It did not generate electrical power, but rather used a water turbine to drive an air compressor. The compressed air was then used to power other machinery or tools.
Today it stands as a Colorado icon, and is reputed to be the most photographed site in the state.

Thanks as always for your visits, faves and more! Hope you all have a great Thursday. BTW, today is the Princess’s first day at her new preschool so there is excitement in the air 🙂

Nice Tooling Factory photos

Nice Tooling Factory photos

A few nice tooling factory images I found:

Factory
tooling factory
Image by marcovdz
Fralib Elephant tea Factory, Gémenos, France.

Swarovski Crystal Worlds – Kristallwelten Swarovski
tooling factory
Image by Cost3l
Facebook Costel Photography

Daniel Swarovski (October 24, 1862 – January 23, 1956), formerly Daniel Swartz, was born in northern Bohemia (now the Czech Republic). His father was a glass cutter who owned a small glass factory. It was there that a young Swarovski served an apprenticeship, becoming skilled in the art of glass-cutting. In 1892 he patented an electric cutting machine that facilitated the production of crystal glass.
In 1895, Swarovski financier Armand Kosman and Franz Weis founded the Swarovski company, originally known as A. Kosmann, Daniel Swartz & Co., which was later shortened to K.S. & Co. The company established a crystal cutting factory in Wattens, Tyrol (Austria), to take advantage of local hydroelectricity for the energy-intensive grinding processes Daniel Swarovski patented. The Swarovski Crystal range includes crystal glass sculptures and miniatures, jewelry and couture, home decor, and chandeliers.
All sculptures are marked with a logo. The original Swarovski logo was an edelweiss flower, which was replaced by an S.A.L. logo, which was finally replaced with the current swan logo in 1988. To create crystal glass that lets light refract in a rainbow spectrum, Swarovski coats some of its products with special metallic chemical coatings. For example, Aurora Borealis, or "AB", gives the surface a rainbow appearance.[8] Other coatings are named by the company, including Crystal Transmission, Volcano, Aurum, and Dorado. Coatings may be applied to only part of an object; others are coated twice, and thus are designated AB 2X, Dorado 2X etc.
In 2004 Swarovski released Xilion, a copyrighted cut designed to optimise the brilliance of Roses (components with flat backs) and Chatons (diamond cut). The Swarovski Group also includes Tyrolit (makers of abrasive and cutting tools); Swareflex (reflective and luminous road markings); Signity (synthetic and natural gemstones); and Swarovski Optik (optical instruments such as binoculars and rifle scopes).
The company runs a crystal-themed museum, Swarovski Kristallwelten (Crystal Worlds) at its original Wattens site (near Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria). The Crystal Worlds centre is fronted by a glass-covered head, the mouth of which is a fountain. The glass-covered Crystal Worlds houses exhibitions related to, or inspired by, the crystals – but do not include explanations of how the famous designs are made, produced or finished. Swarovski work was recently exhibited at Asia’s Fashion Jewellery & Accessories Fair based on the concept of a single continuous beam of fragmented light travelling through a crystal. (Wikipedia)

factory tools
tooling factory
Image by bloomgal

Cool Mold Manufacture Factory images

Cool Mold Manufacture Factory images

A few nice mold manufacture factory images I found:

Inns of Court, Inns Court Green, Bristol, BS4
mold manufacture factory
Image by brizzle born and bred
Anyone remember Inns of Court, public house? (now demolished)

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2056912700/

Inns Court and Filwood farms have medieval origins. The surviving parts of Inns Court, originally Inyn’s Court, are now part of the former Holy Cross Inns Court Vicarage and the staircase turret is now a Grade II* listed building.

The area called Knowle West today was predominately rural; the area consisted largely of agricultural and allotment land interrupted by a handful of small farmhouses (Filwood Farm, Inns court cottage, Hengrove House etc.), and the Nover’s Hill Isolation Hospital. The small settlements in the area existed at least from the medieval period and have undergone only gradual change.

Inns court, built in the 1960s, departed from the garden city layout. It was developed on Radburn principles, named after an American Town designed by clarence Stein and Henry Wright in 1929. In principle, Radburn estates were built with the intention to create neighourhoods that were economically viable communities, accommodating modern lifestyles whilst providing amenities of open space and community services. common features were grouped houses arranged around a cul-de sac street layout thus the street layout broke away from the conventional street grid pattern.

This was replaced by short cul-de-sacs accessed off a circuitous feeder road which in our context is Inns court Drive. Pedestrians were widely segregated from vehicular traffic.

APART from Bedminster, which would appear to date back to Saxon times, not much is known about the early history of south Bristol.

But 30 years ago archaeologists discovered evidence of a Roman settlement – ditches, foundations and a cobbled area – beneath Filwood playing fields. Other finds, from the same area, were discovered during building work in 1973.

Much further back in time, in 1869 in fact, an urn stuffed with “thousands of coins” was unearthed near a small stream on Filwood Farm, near Hengrove Way.

Other buildings from the Roman period had been found at Brislington (a villa) Bedminster Down (coffin and a villa) Gatcombe at Long Ashton (possible weapons manufacture and storage) and at Lyons Court Farm, Whitchurch (coffins, coins and coin moulds).

Another Roman site, possibly a farmstead, was discovered fairly recently in West Street, Bedminster.

In 1997 yet another Roman settlement was found in Knowle West, near to a medieval manor house known as Inns Court. Here, buried outside the foundations of one of the buildings, was the grave of a young female, surrounded by coffin nails.

All the evidence would seem to suggest a small village made up of separate farm buildings. The same excavation also revealed some 14th and 15th-century sections of Inns Court, which, in its time, had been surrounded by over 100 acres of farmland. This building takes its name from Sir John Inyn, Lord Chief Justice of the King’s Bench, whose substantial family home this was and who died here, leaving behind his wife, Alice, daughter, Elizabeth and a son, in 1440.

Sir John, who held high public office under both King Henry V and King Henry IV, was the Recorder of Bristol.

One of his many duties – and one which no doubt took him away from home for long periods – was King’s Assessor to the Duchy of Cornwall.

An important man in his time, you can see his brass memorial (he is in his judge’s robes) in the Lady Chapel of St Mary Redcliffe Church.

The manor house continued to be lived in by Sir John’s descendants until 1529 when it passed to the Kenn family and then, in 1614, to the Poulett family, who, through marriage, owned extensive lands throughout Somerset.

But after being let to tenants the property slowly went into a decline before being sold, in Victorian times, to a Bridgwater man, Thomas Daniel. Daniel, who also let out the manor house, took down most of the old medieval building and replaced it with a far more practical farmhouse.

This, in its turn, was demolished to make way for a vicarage, community centre and a church, Holy Cross – part of the post-war Knowle West housing estate.

A surviving part of the medieval court, however, an octagonal 15th-century stair turret, was incorporated into the new vicarage. In fact it’s a miracle that this bit of heritage survived at all – it took a protest in the Times newspaper to shame the church authorities into preserving it.

Although it has been given a Grade II* listing the building, now empty and disused, has been placed on English Heritage’s “At Risk” register.

As no complete ground plan (or proper documentary record) survives for the old house, we only have a vague idea as what it looked like in Sir John’s time.

The mansion, which was reached by a long track from Lock’s Mills, now buried under Hartcliffe Way, also incorporated a small house and garden in Crox Bottom, near the old Wills’ factory.

In Anglo-Saxon times Filwood (Knowle West) was part of the Kingswood Forest, a royal hunting estate which encompassed large areas of South Gloucestershire and North Somerset.

At the time of the Domesday survey (1086AD) the Inns Court area was part of Bishopsworth (the “Bishop’s Place”) and firmly in Somerset.

Despite the industrial and housing expansion of nearby Bristol, the area remained rural, working farmland, for many hundreds of years.

It included Filwood Farm (demolished in the 1940s) and Inns Court Farm, which both had medieval origins.

The 1930s saw massive, inner city, slum clearances by the Corporation of Bristol.

Just before the outbreak of the Second World War, they decided that they would buy land here, including Inns Court, and develop the area for new homes.

It became known as Filwood, or more popularly, Knowle West. In the early 1970s, a new wave of development, based on a cul-de-sac type layout, was pioneered at Inns Court.

But this has proved unsatisfactory and the estate is now threatened with demolition and a possible long-term rebuilding programme.

What will happen to the remains of Inns Court itself remains to be seen, but it’s vital, given it’s heritage, that it’s preserved in any new development.

If you would like to know more about Roman settlements in the area, and the history of Inns Court, then there is an excellent booklet by Reg Jackson available from Bristol’s M shed museum.

It’s published by Bristol and Region Archaeological Services.

Cool Precision Plastic Injection Die Factory photos

Cool Precision Plastic Injection Die Factory photos

Some cool precision plastic injection die factory pictures:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: South hangar panorama, like Vought OS2U-three Kingfisher seaplane, B-29 Enola Gay, among others
precision plastic injection die factory
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vought OS2U-three Kingfisher:

The Kingfisher was the U.S. Navy’s primary ship-primarily based, scout and observation aircraft during Globe War II. Revolutionary spot welding tactics gave it a smooth, non-buckling fuselage structure. Deflector plate flaps that hung from the wing’s trailing edge and spoiler-augmented ailerons functioned like extra flaps to enable slower landing speeds. Most OS2Us operated in the Pacific, exactly where they rescued several downed airmen, including Planet War I ace Eddie Rickenbacker and the crew of his B-17 Flying Fortress.

In March 1942, this airplane was assigned to the battleship USS Indiana. It later underwent a six-month overhaul in California, returned to Pearl Harbor, and rejoined the Indiana in March 1944. Lt. j.g. Rollin M. Batten Jr. was awarded the Navy Cross for generating a daring rescue in this airplane beneath heavy enemy fire on July four, 1944.

Transferred from the United States Navy.

Manufacturer:
Vought-Sikorsky Aircraft Division

Date:
1937

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
All round: 15ft 1 1/8in. x 33ft 9 1/2in., 4122.6lb., 36ft 1 1/16in. (460 x 1030cm, 1870kg, 1100cm)

Materials:
Wings covered with fabric aft of the primary spar

Physical Description:
Two-seat monoplane, deflector plate flaps hung from the trailing edge of the wing, ailerons drooped at low airspeeds to function like additional flaps, spoilers.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress &quotEnola Gay&quot:

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of Planet War II and the 1st bomber to house its crew in pressurized compartments. Though developed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 located its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a range of aerial weapons: standard bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-constructed B-29-45-MO dropped the 1st atomic weapon employed in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. 3 days later, Bockscar (on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Great Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
All round: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Supplies:
Polished overall aluminum finish

Physical Description:
4-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish general, regular late-Planet War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial quantity on vertical fin 509th Composite Group markings painted in black &quotEnola Gay&quot in black, block letters on reduce left nose.

Most current Mould Manufacturing Factory News

Most current Mould Manufacturing Factory News

1884 Factory Tour of Fry’s Chocolate Bristol
mould manufacturing factory
Image by brizzle born and bred
Anybody who passes along Wine Street, Bristol, will, if he be keen-scented, grow to be totally aware that he is close vicinity of a chocolate factory. The aromatic berry scatters its perfume far and wide.

The manufacture itself is a growth of a century and a half. The first patent, still in the possession of its present companies, is dated 1730, and the old creating where the chocolate was then created, though solid and handsome, stands in vivid contrast to the huge pile of buildings which pour forth the chocolate and cocoa at the rate of a number of tons per day.

Any 1 getting into the factory can not but be impressed with the ceaseless whirl of machinery, the common sense of movement, and the continuous activity that pervade the buildings.

Here is a massive wheel, several feet in diameter, driving a series of grindstones which are pulverizing the nut there is a winnowing machine, which separates the husks close by is an elevator, which lifts the nibs to their subsequent position and so on all through the entire developing — machinery carrying out the function of hand labour, rendering food cheaper, and but obtaining employment for the bigger quantity of workers.

In the factory itself, you thread your way by means of walls of solid chocolate which appears like red granite blocks prepared for a new building instantly contiguous are other people of comparable shape and size, not in contrast to blocks of Portland Stone.

The last are composed of the solidified fat yielded of the cocoa berry in the approach of forming extract of cocoa.

Flanked on either side and piled up to the ceiling are the mountains of the bags containing the cocoa as imported into this nation. On the top floor of the developing the method of manufacture begins exactly where the nuts are roasted in enormous cylindrical roasters, constantly revolving more than a hot fire, and every single cylinder containing about a hundredweight of cocoa beans.

When cooked, the berries are cast into what is technically identified as a hopper — that is, a wooden partition about six feet square, in the center of which is a hole in the slate flooring, and through which the roasted cocoa beans are constantly descending by a conduit to the floor below. Subsequently the husks are separated from the bean itself by a really ingenious through basic arrangement.

The cocoa beans are made to pass in between two quite tiny rollers, which are about a quarter of an inch apart, and on the surface of each and every roller are tiny knife like projections, which break the husk but do not crush the nibs they then pass into the winnowing machine, by the elevators, into the mills, exactly where the beans are crushed into chocolate by, revolving drum, stone mills, or steel roller, until at length it problems, in continuous streams, a rich, fragrant, and deliciously brown liquid.

There is at this point of the manufacture two distinct processes, completely different in their aim: the one particular, the production of cocoa extract the other, the production of Perl and Caracas Cocoa. Cocoa extract is produced by extracting a large proportion of fat from the cocoa.

The mode in which this is effected is not a little singular. The cocoa is place into strong canvas bags, and from its basic appearance which hence manipulated is visibly suggestive of dynamite. These bags are composed of really robust double-sewn canvas.

They are placed into a hollow iron cylinder, the bottom of which moves up by hydraulic power of 1,200 lbs to the square inch, with the result that the fat drops into troughs, and when cool forms those Portland Stone blocks to which we have previously referred.

Whilst the fat is cooling in the troughs, the steel rollers are whirling round, crushing the ordinary nibs and incorporating the sugar, whilst completely manipulating the entire, and shredding into fine delicate flakes that planet-famed Caracas Cocoa.

1 is tempted to pause by the mill and taste as soon as again the luxurious compound of excellent cocoa, sugar, and vanilla.

We English have scarcely reached the point of appreciating how charming a luncheon is afforded by a stick of chocolate and a hunch of fine white bread. In other parts of the performs are small lakes of sugar getting converted into snow-flake, and chocolate being moulded into drops and bonbons.

At other parts there are steam-planes, steam-saws, and other machinery making wood boxes and finishing them with a rapidity that is really marvelous.

In one particular shop there are tin-workers who stamp out the lid, place on the finish, and present you with a completely tight tin canister in anything significantly less than a minute. Everywhere there is pressure, movement, and order.

The nimble fingers that affix the labels to the packets, equally with these that fill the packets themselves, weary the eyes by the rapidity of their movement. Enormous instances travel to and fro, as they pass to one or yet another of the wonderful packing departments, while trollies, laden to the utmost, carry boxes and packages to be sorted out and sent to every single part of England and each quarter of the globe.

A century and a half of constant and ever escalating effort lives in the factory, and those who right now listen to their of cautiously planned machinery can’t fail to don’t forget these early instances when chocolate was the luxury of the wealthy instead of getting, as it is to-day, the everyday necessity of millions of our people.