Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Some cool mould manufacturing factory images:

Image from page 47 of “Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects” (1891)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: rubberhandstamps01sloa
Title: Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Sloane, T. O’Conor (Thomas O’Conor), 1851-1940
Subjects: Hand stamps Rubber
Publisher: New York, N. W. Henley & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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anized product. Sheet rubber is made as above;is vulcanized by some of the absorption processesdescribed in the chapter on vulcaniza-tion. We now come to the second product: regularlymixed and cured rubber. Its starting point isthe washed India rubber from the washer andsheeter. We have seen that the ^^ure gum or caoutchouc isvery sensitive to changes of temperature. At thefreezing point of water it is hard and rigid, and at 42 RUBBER HAND STAMP MAKING the boiling point is like putty in consistency.There are several substances wliich can be made tocombine with the gum and which remove from itthis susceptibility to change of temperature. Theprocess of effecting this combination is called vul-canization, and the product is called vulcanizedindia rubber. Sulphur is the agent most generallyemployed. In the factory the normal vulcanization is carriedout in two steps, mixing and curing. The washedsheet india rubber which has not been masticatedand which must be perfectly dry is the starting

Text Appearing After Image:
Making i^Iixed Ritbber. point, andtlie mixing rolls sliown in the cuts are themechanism for carrying out the first step. Theseare a pair of powerful rollers which are geared so asto work like ordinary rolls, except that one revolves AND THE MANIPULATION OF RUBBER. 43 about three times as fast as the other. They areheated by steam, which is introduced inside ofthem. The sheet is first passed through them afew times to secure its softness, and then the opera-tive begins to sprinkle sulphur upon it as it entersthe rolls. This is continued, the rubber passing andrepassing until perfect incorporation is secured.About ten per cent, of sulphur is added, and a work-man can take care of thirty pounds at a time. This material is incompletely vulcanized. It isin its present condition very amenable to heat andis ready for any moulding process. Generally it isrolled out or ^^ calendered into sheets of differentthickness from which articles are made in mouldsby curing. These sheets are of especial

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Image from page 413 of “Canadian foundryman (1921)” (1921)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: canfoundryman1921toro
Title: Canadian foundryman (1921)
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Foundries Foundry workers
Publisher: Toronto : MacLean Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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supplies.Our lines com-prise the highestgrade equipmentobtainable any-where. You Cant Afford to Overlook theseMoney Saving Opportunities We are offering you at prices beyond comparison the high-est grade Foundry Equipment obtainable anywhere. If youare wide awake for real values investigate these lines. Get Our Prices on Ladle Bowls and Shanks.Steel Bands Steel Slip-over Jackets.Steel Core Plates.Wooden Snap Flasks. Youll find longer servicein our flat bottom steelladle bowls. These bowlscome in capacities from 50to 800 lbs. Dont shove this oppor-tunity aside. Write atonce for Prices and liberalDiscounts. All Steel Core Ovens Thes* core ovens have nocast parts to break. Extrasmoke pipe connection takesexcess smoke away. Alldoors have Battle Plate toreduce heat loss when door isopen. pAMP pROS Tote Box, Barrels, etc.All-Steel Core Ovens. Manufacturing and Welding Co. We can supply AluminumPattern Plates in any size. 825 DUPONT STREET, TORONTO, ONTARIO 26 CANADIAN FOUNDRYMAN Volume XII

Text Appearing After Image:
Heres the history of this jobin a jobbing foundry beforeand after machine-moulding:- Weight, 275 pounds.Flask (inside). 42 x 33 x 24 high. Before Mounting—One man put up4 moulds in 7 hours After Mounting— 4 men and one No. machine put up 45 moulds in 7 hours. 435 Labor Required For moulding, coring, closingand pouring each moudBefore—2V* man-hours.After—8-10ths man-hrs. Cost of Mounting Pattern,including labor andmaterials, .00. Labor Cost reduced 62 M: /<. Cost of Pattern Mounting saved on the first 28moulds. Reducing costs to meet1921 requirements J7CONOMY in productionis the keynote of 1921 man-ufacturing and selling prob-lems. Extravagant produc-tion costs can no longer bepassed on to a helpless con-sumer. Machine-molding must be util-ized wherever possible in orderthat selling prices will seemreasonable to buyers.The Osborn Manufacturing Company INCORPORATED Main Office and Factory 5401 Hamilton Ave. Cleveland, Ohio New York San Francisco

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Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Check out these mould manufacturing factory images:

Mould making/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts/CNC Precision Parts Manufacturing与您共享了 相册。
mould manufacturing factory
Image by ccrweb
Dear Sir/Ms,

Good day!
As an ISO certified factory, we specialized manufacture Mould making/ Sheet
metal process/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts, with
strong competitive price and excellent quality, for more than 20 years.
Any questions and enquiries will be highly regarded. Just email us the
drawing and detailed requirement, you will get a complete quotation with
technical analysis within 24 hours.

Your prompt reply is highly appreciated.

Best regards sincerely!

Michael

Nice China Mould photos

Nice China Mould photos

Check out these china mould images:

NYC – Metropolitan Museum of Art: Armor for Man and Horse
china mould
Image by wallyg
Armors for Man and Horse
Etched steel
Wolfgang Grosschedel (record 1517-1562)
German (Landshut), man’s armor around 1535, horse armor date 1554

Wolfgang Grosschedel was the most famous Landshut armorer of his generation. Included among his patrons were the Holy Roman Emperor and Philip II of Spain. These armors for man and horse constitute superb examples of Grosschedel’s work from different periods in his career.

The man’s armor, dating from about 1535, is stamped with Grosschedel’s personal mark and that of LAndshut. The etched decoration includes human figures and ornaments copied from engravings by the German printmaker Barthel Beham.

The horse armor, dated 1554, is complete and homogenous and though unmarked can be attributed to Grosschedel on stylistic grounds.

**

The collection of armor, edged weapons, and firearms in The Metropolitan Museum of Art ranks with those of the other great armories of the world, in Vienna, Madrid, Dresden, and Paris. It consists of approximately 15,000 objects that range in date from about 400 B.C. to the nineteenth century. Though Western Europe and Japan are the regions most strongly represented–the collection of more than five thousand pieces of Japanese armor and weapons is the finest outside Japan–the geographical range of the collection is extraordinary, with examples from the Near East, the Middle East, India, Central Asia, China, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, and North America. The Arms and Armor Galleries were renovated and reinstalled in 1991 to display to better effect the outstanding collection of armor and weapons of sculptural and ornamental beauty from around the world.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art‘s permanent collection contains more than two million works of art from around the world. It opened its doors on February 20, 1872, housed in a building located at 681 Fifth Avenue in New York City. Under their guidance of John Taylor Johnston and George Palmer Putnam, the Met’s holdings, initially consisting of a Roman stone sarcophagus and 174 mostly European paintings, quickly outgrew the available space. In 1873, occasioned by the Met’s purchase of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot antiquities, the museum decamped from Fifth Avenue and took up residence at the Douglas Mansion on West 14th Street. However, these new accommodations were temporary; after negotiations with the city of New York, the Met acquired land on the east side of Central Park, where it built its permanent home, a red-brick Gothic Revival stone "mausoleum" designed by American architects Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mold. As of 2006, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet, more than 20 times the size of the original 1880 building.

In 2007, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was ranked #17 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1967. The interior was designated in 1977.

National Historic Register #86003556

Ficus pumila L.
china mould
Image by Ahmad Fuad Morad
Kelana Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.

Ficus pumila L. Moraceae. CN: [Malay – Ara jalar], Climbing fig, Creeping fig, Creeping rubberplant, Figvine. Native to China, Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam. Elsewhere cultivated as ornamental. Creeping fig is an enthusiastic climber able to scramble up vertical surfaces 3 and 4 stories tall with the aid of a powerful adhesive. This vine coats surfaces with a tracery of fine stems that are densely covered with small heart shaped leaves that are 1 inch long by about 2 cm wide, they are held closely to the surface creating a mat of foliage that extends barely 2.5 cm from the surface. These are the juvenile leaves. Once the vine has reach the top of its support if will begin to form horizontal branches on which adult foliage is borne. Adult leaves are held alternately in two rows along these branches. They are more leathery than the juveniles, and are dark green, and about 7.6 cm long by 5 cm wide. The fruit is a fig (a sycamore). These are borne only on the horizontal stems, they are pale green in color and about 7.6 cm long by 6.4 cm wide. Most experts warn against allowing the climbing fig to attach itself to your home, garage, or other valuable buildings. This winding vine will peel paint, pop screws, and otherwise wreak havoc on fences, buildings, and any other structure. It can also attract insects and mold that cause costly damage. Very invasive and difficult to eradicate. The seeds and other plant parts are poisonous.

Synonym(s):
Ficus awkeotsang Makino [Ficus pumila var. awkeotsang]
Ficus repens Rottler [Ficus pumila var. pumila]

Ref and suggested reading:
www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?16951
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficus_pumila
www.bitterrootrestoration.com/medicinal-plants/creeping-f…

Cool China Foam Mould images

Cool China Foam Mould images

Some cool china foam mould images:

Image from page 13 of “China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire” (1843)
china foam mould
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Identifier: chinainseriesofv3to4allo
Title: China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire
Year: 1843 (1840s)
Authors: Allom, Thomas, 1804-1872 Wright, G. N. (George Newenham), 1790?-1877, editor Fisher, Son, & Co., publisher
Subjects:
Publisher: London, Newgate Street Paris, rue St. Honoré : Fisher, Son, & Co.
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

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-, from the Outer Harbour 56 A Marriage Procession 58 Landing-place at tlie Yuk-shan ……….. 60 Silk Farms at Iloo-chow ………… 61 A Devotee consulting the Sticks of Fate 64 Great Temple at Honan 66 The Emperor Taou-kwang reviewing his Guard? …….. 67

Text Appearing After Image:
4 ^ -^ ^ -^ CHINA. THE WOO-TANG MOUNTAINS. PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI. The wild streams leap with headlong sweep,In their ciirbless course oer the mountain steep :All fresh and strong they foam along,Waking the rocks with their cataract song. The Recluse or the Rock. In the schistose district of the Meilung mountains, that engross the southern part ofKiang-si, the forms of the cliffs and the crags are more varied than art could ever havemade them, and than nature generally does. The goddess, however, in a sportive mood,seems to have moulded the amazingly diversified surface of the Woo-tang rocks, inwhich the Kan-kiang-ho has its source; for, the toppling position of the great mass thatoverhangs the village of Woo-tang and the vale of Nan-kang-foo, is obedient ratherto the strength of adhesion than the laws of gravit). An Alpine grandeur pervadesthe whole mountain chain to the north of the Meilung group; and the Chinese are soentirely devoted to pleasure, so much engrossed by superstition, s

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Some Insights into Mould Manufacturers and Their Processes

Some Insights into Mould Manufacturers and Their Processes

Using of plastic is common in these days and you can’t say that plastic does not have any importance in our life. The only thing you can say that, we can’t spend even a single day without using plastic products. This becomes possible due to the advanced recycling technology. But, what makes plastic looks in different shape and size? The answer is the moulding process. All mould manufacturers uses this process, where plastic is shaped with the help of a rigid frame which is known as mould. With this technique, it becomes possible to create objects of different shapes and sizes. It is also possible to create complex designs by using this process. The moulding parts are used to create voluminous items and parts of automobiles and vehicles.

Plastic injection moulding techniques have become quite popular and there are reliable methods for getting high quality mould products. Moulding method is the most important method and is considered as one of the finest techniques for a number of reasons. Some of the reasons are as follows.

* This is a convenient technology and can be controlled with ease and the possibility of mistakes is less. Injection moulding technique provides the high quality of products and can be churned out very fast and very conveniently.
* Pre-form mould manufacturers enjoy several cost advantages when they use injection moulding technique. The amount of wastage is very low. This procedure saves a lot of resources and enjoys certain cost benefits which can be passed on to the clients.
* Injection moulding process ensures efficiency to the manufacturer. There is minimum chance of getting defective product. The pre-form mold manufacturer ensures better quality of product to their clients and gets greater faith and reliance in this form of moulding.
* Commercial clients get their interest for plastic products made using injection moulding technology. Such products can be relied upon as they are more stable and durable. The demand of these moulded made products is quite high in the market. Due to the less wastage products, the traders get huge cost advantages.
* After the introduction of this process, it becomes possible for the clients to get their orders earlier than ever. The process of fast production also increases the client value in the market. Due to the accuracy of the machines, these are able to produce accurate products in less interval of time.
* The technology has also encouraged pre-form mold manufacturer to mix out products which are diverse in color, shape and size. It is possible because of the superior methods that now it is very much possible to come up with some unique designs and colors.

Because of all these advantages, anyone can say that injection moulding process had indeed revolutionizes the industry. Pre-form mould manufacturers are fully depends on it for making products of different size and shape. If you want to contact one of the manufacturer to get the desire shape and size of product, then internet will be very helpful for you in finding one of them.

George Clinton deals in products made of plastic and often hires CorelMould.com for his injection moulding requirements. Among the leading mould manufacturers in China, CorelMould has built over 4000 challenging moulds for all kinds of plastic. The author admires the quick response, minimum lead time, top standards of quality and competitive pricing of this trusted mold manufacturer.
Nice Pp Joint Fitting Mould photos

Nice Pp Joint Fitting Mould photos

A few nice pp joint fitting mould images I found:

Image from page 63 of “Home mission handicraft; ideas for work and play in mission bands and junior societies” (1908)
pp joint fitting mould
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Identifier: homemissionhandi00bear
Title: Home mission handicraft; ideas for work and play in mission bands and junior societies
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Beard, Lina Beard, Adelia B. (Adelia Belle), 1857-1920, joint author
Subjects: Amusements
Publisher: New York, C. Scribner’s Sons
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Fig. 264.—Then a curveabove the circle. Fig- 265.—Another curveabove the first one. Fig. 266.— Connect thelower curve with thecircle by two lines. large enough to allow a coarse darning-needle to be passedreadily through them ; then bend the clock into shape, fit-ting the extension PP over the extension QQ; the twoholes in PP must lie exactly over those in ^^^ Glue the 54 Handicraft for Girls clock together, using the blunt end of a lead-pencil, or anykind of a stick, to assist in holding the sides and tops to-gether until the glue is perfectly dry. Thread a piece of heavy black darning-cotton in the larg-

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 267.—Draw a small Fig. 268.—Connect the two Fig. 269.—Extend line of uppercircle above the large one. circles by two scallops. circle down to form a square. est-sized long darning-needle you can find; on one end ofthe thread mould a cylinder-shaped piece of beeswax, coverit with thin tinfoil, then open the clock-door and hold the

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Commodity Mould to Produce High Quality Products

Commodity Mould to Produce High Quality Products

Technology has made life so easy, the availability of boundless commodities used in daily schedule has made it call a hustle free life. Earlier, when a single task involved a lot of labor, today advancement has led to cut short the processes making it easy for an individual to lead a painless life than it was before. Such commodities even make the household appear tidy, this includes the usage of simple articles like bin, storage box, jug, flower pot, bucket etc.

These commodities yet elementary, but play a meaningful role in our lives. Ever wondered how these commodities have been made available to us? Various companies work to manufacture articles making life simpler, this holds a tough procedure which is carried out using commodity mould. HQMOULD is one such prominent company known to be specialized in producing plastic moulds ranging from those for producing not only commodities but other materials as well.

More about the company

Established in 1970, HQMOULD is a private company based in China. The professionals and trained technicians work to produce world class quality of moulds. Numerous moulds are manufactured for the purpose of automotive parts, plastic pallets, household commodities and many others. The availability of machinery for making moulds has made it possible to produce varies designs of a particular mould making it to be used for multi-purpose.

Professional use both creativity and technology to produce mould in a variety of shapes. The technological equipments used are much more advanced enabling customer satisfaction in areas such as mould designing and product development by the usage of an extensive set of machines collectively. The company was awarded for its quality in producing material by the inputs of more than 100 employees which include all engineers and workers.

Plastic mould China

Plastic moulds are preferred among others due to the fact that the material is much more user friendly. The articles produced tend to be flexible making it easy to be maintained. There are many other benefits are well, flexibility in material allows it to blend in a variety of shapes as per requirement. The procedure thus involves less labor and minimal time is required in producing articles. Plastics even tend to be cheaper as compared to other materials and can be reused by recycling.

Furthermore, it is a bit cumbersome to clean other materials; plastics can be easily cleaned even due to its quality of being light-weight. Like as in case of plastic pallets, the purpose helps serve the portability of heavy equipments and even reduces the changes of massive spillage caused by toxic fluids. The main aim to keep the area clean is achieved by using plastic pallets be it a residence or a commercial area.

Plastic is even used in the manufacturing of automobile parts. The use of plastic reduces its weight when then reduces energy applied. All varieties of parts can be produced by a plastic mould. Considering that producing moulds for automotive parts is not an easy task, a professional keeps an eye on every minute detail allowing to satisfying the quality of production.

This article is written by Jacob Williams on behalf of HQMOULD. His knowledge in plastic moulding industry has seen him contribute to and write several articles on topics like Plastic Mould, commodity mould , Plastic mould manufacturer, Custom Mould, Mould China and plastic mould China etc.
Nice Two Shots Mould China photos

Nice Two Shots Mould China photos

Check out these two shots mould china images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Northrop P-61C Black Widow
two shots mould china
Image by Chris Devers
Compare & contrast:

Northrop P-61C Black widow:
* Front view
* Above view

Star Wars ARC-170 Fighter:
* Official page
* Wikia
* Wikipedia
* Toy review

I put it to you that they’re the SAME THING.

* twin engines
* double-cockpit in front
* gunner’s cockpit in back
* broad wing coming out from the middle

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Steven F. Udvar-Hazy | Northrop P-61C Black Widow:

The P-61 Black Widow was the first U.S. aircraft designed to locate and destroy enemy aircraft at night and in bad weather, a feat made possible by the use of on-board radar. The prototype first flew in 1942. P-61 combat operations began just after D-Day, June 6, 1944, when Black Widows flew deep into German airspace, bombing and strafing trains and road traffic. Operations in the Pacific began at about the same time. By the end of World War II, Black Widows had seen combat in every theater and had destroyed 127 enemy aircraft and 18 German V-1 buzz bombs.

The Museum’s Black Widow, a P-61C-1-NO, was delivered to the Army Air Forces in July 1945. It participated in cold-weather tests, high-altitude drop tests, and in the National Thunderstorm Project, for which the top turret was removed to make room for thunderstorm monitoring equipment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Northrop Aircraft Inc.

Date:
1943

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 450 x 1500cm, 10637kg, 2000cm (14ft 9 3/16in. x 49ft 2 9/16in., 23450.3lb., 65ft 7 3/8in.)

Long Description:
The P-61 Black Widow was the first United States aircraft designed from the start to find and destroy other aircraft at night and in bad weather. It served in combat for only the final year of World War II but flew in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific, and China-Burma-India theaters. Black Widow crews destroyed 127 enemy aircraft and 18 robot V-1 buzz bombs.

Jack Northrop’s big fighter was born during the dark days of the Battle of Britain and the London Blitz in 1940. British successes against German daylight bombers forced the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) to shift to night bombing. By the time Royal Air Force (RAF) Spitfires could launch, climb out, and then try to intercept these raids, the bombers crews had usually dropped their loads and turned for home. An aircraft was needed to patrol the skies over England for up to seven hours during the night, and then follow radar vectors to attack German aircraft before they reached their target. U.S. Army Air Corps officers noted this requirement and decided that America must have a night fighter if and when it entered the war.

The Army awarded a contract to Northrop on January 30, 1941. The resulting design featured twin tail booms and rudders for stability when the aircraft closed in behind an intruder. It was a large aircraft with a big fuel load and two powerful engines. Armament evolved into four 20 mm cannons mounted in the belly firing forward and a powered, remote-controlled turret on top of the center fuselage equipped with four .50 cal. machine guns. The three-man crew consisted of the pilot, a gunner seated behind him, and a radar observer/gunner at the rear behind the gun turret. Only the pilot could fire the cannons but any of the three could operate the machine guns.

Simultaneously, work was proceeding, at a laboratory run by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to develop the airborne radar set. The Army tested an early design in a Douglas B-18 in 1941. The much-improved SCR-520 set was ready by early 1942. Meanwhile, Army enthusiasm for the XP-61 produced another contract on March 10, 1941, for 13 service-test YP-61s. Even before these airplanes flew, Northrop received orders for 410 production machines! Northrop test pilot Vance Breeze flew the aircraft on May 26, 1942. Although the Black Widow was nearly as large as a medium bomber, it was a true fighter. The only prohibited flight maneuvers were outside loops, sustained inverted flight, and deliberate spins.

As Northrop advanced the design toward production, supply problems arose and modifications became necessary. The 4-gun top turret was the same type fitted to the top forward position on the Boeing B-29 Superfortress (see NASM collection) and that bomber had production priority over the P-61. As a result, several hundred P-61s did not have this turret. Those that did experienced buffeting when the turret was traversed from side to side and a fix took time. By October 1943, the first P-61s were coming off the line. Training started immediately, and the first night fighters arrived in the European Theater by March 1944. Combat operations began just after D-Day (June 6) and the Black Widows quickly departed from their original role as defensive interceptors and became aggressors. They flew deep into German airspace, bombing and strafing trains and road traffic and making travel difficult for the enemy by day and at night.

P-61s arrived in the Pacific Theater at about the same time as the European Black Widows. For years, the Japanese had operated lone bombers over Allied targets at night and now U. S. fighters could locate and attack them. However, on June 30, 1944, a Mitsubishi BETTY (see NASM collection) became the first P-61 kill in the Pacific. Soon, Black Widows controlled the night skies. On the night of August 14-15, a P-61 named "Lady in the Dark" by her crew encountered an intruding Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Peregrine Falcon) OSCAR (see NASM collection) and eventually forced it into the sea without firing a shot. Although the war was officially over, no one was sure that all of the Japanese had heard the message and stopped fighting. The American night fighters flew again the next night and "Lady in the Dark" again found a target. It was a Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki (Demon) TOJO and the fighters maneuvered wildly as they attempted to gain an advantage. The P-61 crew lost and reacquired the Ki-44 several times then finally lost it for good and returned to base. The next day ground troops found the wrecked TOJO. In the darkness, Lady in the Dark’s crew had forced the Japanese pilot to fly into the ground, again without firing a shot.

With the war over, the Army cancelled further production. Northrop had built 706 aircraft including 36 with a highly modified center fuselage. These F-15As (later redesignated RF-61C) mounted a number of cameras in the nose and proved able reconnaissance platforms. Many of these airplanes participated in the first good aerial photographic survey of the Pacific islands. A few, plus some special purpose P-61s, stayed in active service until 1950.

NASM’s Black Widow is a P-61C-1-NO, U.S. Army Air Forces serial number 43-8330. Northrop delivered it to the Army on July 28, 1945. By October 18, this P-61 was flying at Ladd Field, Alaska, in cold weather tests and it remained there until March 30, 1946. This airplane later moved to Pinecastle Air Force Base, Florida, for participation in the National Thunderstorm Project. The project’s goal was to learn more about thunderstorms and to use this knowledge to better protect civil and military airplanes that operated near them. The U. S. Weather Bureau and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) undertook the study with cooperation from the Army Air Forces and Navy. With its radar and particular flight characteristics, the P-61 was capable of finding the most turbulent regions of a storm, penetrating them, and returning crew and instruments intact for detailed study.

Pinecastle personnel removed the guns and turret from 43-8330 in July 1946 to make room for new equipment. In September, the aircraft moved to Clinton County Army Air Base, Ohio, where it remained until January 1948. The Air Force then assigned the aircraft to the Flight Test Division at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. After declaring the airplane surplus in 1950, the Air Force stored it at Park Ridge, Illinois, on October 3 along with important aircraft destined for the National Air Museum.

But 43-8830 was not done flying. NACA asked the Smithsonian to lend them the aircraft for use in another special program. The committee wanted to investigate how aerodynamic shapes behaved when dropped from high altitude. The Black Widow arrived at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California, on February 14, 1951. NACA returned the aircraft and delivered it to the Smithsonian at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on August 10, 1954. When the engines shut down for the last time, this P-61 had accumulated only 530 total flight hours. Smithsonian personnel trucked it to the Paul Garber Facility in Suitland, Maryland. In 2006, the aircraft was preserved and assembled at the Udvar-Hazy Center. The three different paint schemes from its past service life have been revealed by carefully removing individual layers of paint.