Image from page 168 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 168 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

A few nice china mould images I found:

Image from page 168 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)
china mould
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Identifier: americanhomesgar41907newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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rked: I havescarcely a piece that properly belongshere. We shall have to live up tothis house by slow degrees. Butbetter this way than to have a repre-sentative collection of historicalfurniture in a poor architectural set-ting. That is an almost hopelessanachronism because it is practicallyimpossible to do anything with thehouse, especially if the furniture beof the vintage of say 1875. Everycultivated person, nowadays, is afurniture collector who is constantlyweeding out and improving his stock.Another decided advantage thearchitect had was permission to usethe small sized lights in the loweras well as the upper half of thewindows. Not many of an archi-tects patrons will readily agree tothis, and he often had much con-cern how to gain the atmosphere sonecessary to ones happiness with the big sheets of plate glassclients have demanded. Indeed the sash bars do not obscurethe vision as is always argued, more than ones vision isobscured by the projection of the nose. One may look cross-

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An Artistic Inglenook in the Dining-room Hasa Paneled Seat and a Colonial Mantel A Stairway Within the Stately Doorway Isthe Feature of the Paneled Hall A Quaint China Cabinet Is Built in the Cornerof the Dining-room it, and that is a development of our own day, but with sev-eral advantages, the two piers being united by an arch in theattic. We do not expect every one, however, to note all the his-torical development which has been faithfully carried out inthis Highland Mills cottage. The orthodox details, oneafter another, will impress themselves upon the much in-terested reader, such as the overhanging upon which he willone day discover the molded chamfers which, to give themill that did the work due credit, are beautifully executed,likewise the molded drops, all very satisfactory. The ex-periments of the interior were not less successful, but are eyed, and encounter the objection, but one does not care tolook cross-eyed habitually. It all depends upon the point offocus chosen. Ther

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Image from page 130 of “History of art” (1921)
china mould
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Identifier: historyofar02faur
Title: History of art
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Faure, Elie, 1873-1937 Pach, Walter, 1883-1958
Subjects: Art
Publisher: New York and London : Harper & brothers
Contributing Library: PIMS – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Buddhist Art. Lacquered wood. {Louvre.) concealed from Western eyes the true nature of Japan,the Occident was astonished at the speed with which entire chapter, as also all the others treating of the non-European arts, inthe volume devoted to the Middle Ages, which should be looked upon as astate of mind rather than as a historical period. It is to be observed, how-ever, that Japanese individualism tends, from the fifteenth century onward,as in the Occident, to detach itself from the religious and philosophic synthesis which characterizes the mediaeval spirit. JAPAN 103 Japan assimilated the external form of the Europeancivilizations. At a bound it covered the road that wehad taken four hundred years to travel. The Occident

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Buddhist Art. Buddha. Wooden statue. {Louvre.) could not understand. It thought the effort dispro-portionate to the means and destined to failure. Ittook for servile imitation the borrowing of a methodwhose practical value Japan could appreciate before 104 MEDIAEVAL ART she utilized it, because old habits of artistic and meta-physical abstraction had prepared the mind of thepeople for Western ideas. Under her new armamentof machines, of ships, and of cannons, Japan retainedthe essentials of what had constituted and what stillconstitutes her strength — her faith in herself, hercontrolled passion, her spirit of analysis and recon-struction. The reproach addressed to Europeanized Japan isnot new. She had been accused of acquiring from China—and through China from India—her religion, herphilosophy, her art, and her political institutions,whereas she had transformed everything, recast every-thing in the mold of a savagely original mind. If onewere to go back to the sources of history

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Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Cool Mould Manufacturing Factory images

Some cool mould manufacturing factory images:

Image from page 47 of “Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects” (1891)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: rubberhandstamps01sloa
Title: Rubber hand stamps and the manipulation of rubber; a practical treatise on the manufacture of India rubber hand stamps, small articles of India rubber, the hektograph, special inks, cements, and allied subjects
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Sloane, T. O’Conor (Thomas O’Conor), 1851-1940
Subjects: Hand stamps Rubber
Publisher: New York, N. W. Henley & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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anized product. Sheet rubber is made as above;is vulcanized by some of the absorption processesdescribed in the chapter on vulcaniza-tion. We now come to the second product: regularlymixed and cured rubber. Its starting point isthe washed India rubber from the washer andsheeter. We have seen that the ^^ure gum or caoutchouc isvery sensitive to changes of temperature. At thefreezing point of water it is hard and rigid, and at 42 RUBBER HAND STAMP MAKING the boiling point is like putty in consistency.There are several substances wliich can be made tocombine with the gum and which remove from itthis susceptibility to change of temperature. Theprocess of effecting this combination is called vul-canization, and the product is called vulcanizedindia rubber. Sulphur is the agent most generallyemployed. In the factory the normal vulcanization is carriedout in two steps, mixing and curing. The washedsheet india rubber which has not been masticatedand which must be perfectly dry is the starting

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Making i^Iixed Ritbber. point, andtlie mixing rolls sliown in the cuts are themechanism for carrying out the first step. Theseare a pair of powerful rollers which are geared so asto work like ordinary rolls, except that one revolves AND THE MANIPULATION OF RUBBER. 43 about three times as fast as the other. They areheated by steam, which is introduced inside ofthem. The sheet is first passed through them afew times to secure its softness, and then the opera-tive begins to sprinkle sulphur upon it as it entersthe rolls. This is continued, the rubber passing andrepassing until perfect incorporation is secured.About ten per cent, of sulphur is added, and a work-man can take care of thirty pounds at a time. This material is incompletely vulcanized. It isin its present condition very amenable to heat andis ready for any moulding process. Generally it isrolled out or ^^ calendered into sheets of differentthickness from which articles are made in mouldsby curing. These sheets are of especial

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Image from page 413 of “Canadian foundryman (1921)” (1921)
mould manufacturing factory
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Identifier: canfoundryman1921toro
Title: Canadian foundryman (1921)
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Foundries Foundry workers
Publisher: Toronto : MacLean Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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supplies.Our lines com-prise the highestgrade equipmentobtainable any-where. You Cant Afford to Overlook theseMoney Saving Opportunities We are offering you at prices beyond comparison the high-est grade Foundry Equipment obtainable anywhere. If youare wide awake for real values investigate these lines. Get Our Prices on Ladle Bowls and Shanks.Steel Bands Steel Slip-over Jackets.Steel Core Plates.Wooden Snap Flasks. Youll find longer servicein our flat bottom steelladle bowls. These bowlscome in capacities from 50to 800 lbs. Dont shove this oppor-tunity aside. Write atonce for Prices and liberalDiscounts. All Steel Core Ovens Thes* core ovens have nocast parts to break. Extrasmoke pipe connection takesexcess smoke away. Alldoors have Battle Plate toreduce heat loss when door isopen. pAMP pROS Tote Box, Barrels, etc.All-Steel Core Ovens. Manufacturing and Welding Co. We can supply AluminumPattern Plates in any size. 825 DUPONT STREET, TORONTO, ONTARIO 26 CANADIAN FOUNDRYMAN Volume XII

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Heres the history of this jobin a jobbing foundry beforeand after machine-moulding:- Weight, 275 pounds.Flask (inside). 42 x 33 x 24 high. Before Mounting—One man put up4 moulds in 7 hours After Mounting— 4 men and one No. machine put up 45 moulds in 7 hours. 435 Labor Required For moulding, coring, closingand pouring each moudBefore—2V* man-hours.After—8-10ths man-hrs. Cost of Mounting Pattern,including labor andmaterials, .00. Labor Cost reduced 62 M: /<. Cost of Pattern Mounting saved on the first 28moulds. Reducing costs to meet1921 requirements J7CONOMY in productionis the keynote of 1921 man-ufacturing and selling prob-lems. Extravagant produc-tion costs can no longer bepassed on to a helpless con-sumer. Machine-molding must be util-ized wherever possible in orderthat selling prices will seemreasonable to buyers.The Osborn Manufacturing Company INCORPORATED Main Office and Factory 5401 Hamilton Ave. Cleveland, Ohio New York San Francisco

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Cool Moldings Equipment China images

Cool Moldings Equipment China images

Check out these moldings equipment china images:

Image from page 349 of “How to paint : an instruction book with full description of all the materials necessary.” (1894)
moldings equipment china
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Identifier: howtopaintinstru00asal
Title: How to paint : an instruction book with full description of all the materials necessary.
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: A.S. Aloe Company.
Subjects: Artists’ materials–Catalogs Painting–Technique Fountain pens–Catalogs Pyrography–Equipment and supplies–Catalogs China painting–Equipment and supplies–Catalogs Trade catalogs–Artists’ materials Trade catalogs–Fountain pens Trade catalogs–Pyrography–Equipment and supplies Trade catalogs–China painting–Equipment and supplies.
Publisher: A.S. Aloe Company, St. Louis
Contributing Library: Winterthur Museum Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Color Preservingf Medium Indelible Fabric Paintingr The only Medium yet discovered by wliichpainting with oil colors can be done on silk,linen or cotton cloth, rendering the fabric softand pliable and 3et indelible and unfadingwhen laundered. Useful in decorating dresses,bed spreads and shams, curtains, draperies,table linen, dojlies, etc. If in place of turpentine the Medium isused in painting on bolting cloth, the workwill be transparent, yet unfading, and canbe easily washed. Each bottle contains 4 ozs.and will paint a large amount of surface. BERLIN CHEMICAL CO., Mgrs.. BERLIN, WIS. H. A. HYATT, MANUFACTURER, IMPORTER ANDDEALER IN Photographic Supplies, ARTISTS MATERIALS. PICTURE FRAMES, MOULDINGS,ALBUMS, ETC. N. E. Cor. Eighth and Locust Streets, St. Louis, Mo.

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Family Medicine Chest, S5.OO. It contains thirty vials, two drachms each,of the principal remedies, such as are usedin simple cases of Colds, Coughs, Headache,Diarrhoea, Childrens Troubles, etc. The J2.00 Case contains twelve vials, twodrachms each, including a Practical Guide toHomoeopathy. The 1^1.00 Case contains twelve vials, onedrachm each. Libera! Discount to Physicians and Druggists. FOR SALE BY HENRY R. LUYTIES, Manufacturing Homceopathic Druggist, 2i8 Pine Street, ST. LOUIS, MO. HOW TO PAINT. 343

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Cool Mold Products images

Cool Mold Products images

A few nice mold products images I found:

Two free splicing blocks with each reel!
mold products
Image by Carbon Arc
Kodak 7-inch (17.8cm) tape reel, early 1960s. Along their well-known photographic and motion-picture products, Eastman Kodak also manufactured recording tape and tape reels.

One distinguishing feature of their tape reels was a splicing block molded into each side of the reel. Using special splicing tape and a single-edged razor blade according to instructions printed inside the box, hobbyists could splice their own tape the same way professionals did.

Cool Mold Chinese images

Cool Mold Chinese images

A few nice mold chinese images I found:

2016 – China – Beijing – Cloisonné – 1 of 5
mold chinese
Image by Ted’s photos – For Me & You
After we left the Badaling Great Wall we went to a cloisonné factory, shop and restaurant for lunch. After lunch we wandered around the shop and factory.

Cloisonné is colourful handicraft articles made by a complex manufacturing process. It includes inlaying thin gold threads or copper wires into various patterns, hammering the base, inlaying copper strips, soldering, filling with enamel, firing the enamel, polishing, gilding and adhering enamels of various colors to copper molds.

Introduced into the Middle Kingdom in the 13th century, this technique became a typically Chinese art. The technique remains common in China to the present day

Jardin Royal Chinese Restaurant Newbridge – County Kildare (Ireland)
mold chinese
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Newbridge is a town in County Kildare, Ireland. Its population of 21,561 (2011 Census) making it the largest town in County Kildare and the 15th. largest in Ireland.

The town is located on the banks of the River Liffey, which provides a range of natural amenities. Upriver are towns such as Athgarvan, Kilcullen and Blessington, while downriver are the towns of Caragh, Clane and Celbridge.

Newbridge is bounded by the Curragh Plains to the west, Pollardstown Fen and the Bog of Allen and Moulds Bog to the north west. Around the Curragh, and to the east are many important stud farms.

To the south the motorway now forms a boundary to the town.

Today Newbridge is a thriving town with a population approaching 21,661, a major centre for industry and commerce, within the South Kildare region.

Cool Pipe Fitting Moulding Design images

Cool Pipe Fitting Moulding Design images

A few nice pipe fitting moulding design images I found:

Image from page 48 of “Morton memorial; a history of the Stevens institute of technology, with biographies of the trustees, faculty, and alumni, and a record of the achievements of the Stevens family of engineers” (1905)
pipe fitting moulding design
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Identifier: mortonmemorialhi00furm
Title: Morton memorial; a history of the Stevens institute of technology, with biographies of the trustees, faculty, and alumni, and a record of the achievements of the Stevens family of engineers
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: Furman, Franklin De Ronde, 1870- ed
Subjects: Stevens family Morton, Henry, 1836-1902 Stevens Institute of Technology
Publisher: Hoboken, N.J., Stevens institute of technology
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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For a number of years previous to 1881 the shop-work course was arrangedso that, after a prescribed set of exercises in carpenter-work and wood-turning,millwrighting and steam-fitting, machinist-work, blacksmithing, molding, found-ing, and pattern-making had been performed by a class, the students were permit-ted to complete the course by constructing some machine. Thus the Class of 1876 built a Thurston autographic testing-machine. GROWTH OF THE INSTITUTE 19 several important features of the design having been previously planned in thedrawing-room. The Class of 1877 built a lubricant testing-machine. A part of the Class of 1878 assisted in the design and construction of alarge oil-tester, while other portions of the class designed and constructed a Pronydynamometer, a small horizontal engine, and a small oscillating engine. The Class of 1879 built an autographic transmitting dynamometer. The Class of 1880 assisted in the construction of a 3 V2-horse-power com-pound condensing engine.

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Ground Floor of the Carnegie Laboratory of Engineering The construction of a machine as a final exercise in the shop was there-after discontinued. Subsequent classes devoted the time which had been sospent to the performance of more extended series of exercises in the variousbranches of the shop course. About the time this change took effect, the shop course was also consid-erably extended, and a course in experimental mechanics inaugurated. This course included, as then planned, a series of sixteen experimentalexercises comprising, among others, a test of the evaporative power of boilers; 20 THE STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY experimental determination of the total heat of combustion of coal used in boilertests, and comparison of this heat with that computed from the analysis of thecoal; measurement of the friction of steam flowing through pipes; comparison ofefficiency of steam pump and injector. Order of Exercises in Experimental Mechanics, Class of 1902 Supplementary Term, June a

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Mould making/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts/CNC Precision Parts Manufacturing与您共享了 相册。
mould manufacturing factory
Image by ccrweb
Dear Sir/Ms,

Good day!
As an ISO certified factory, we specialized manufacture Mould making/ Sheet
metal process/ Die-casting/ Precision stamping/ Machining parts, with
strong competitive price and excellent quality, for more than 20 years.
Any questions and enquiries will be highly regarded. Just email us the
drawing and detailed requirement, you will get a complete quotation with
technical analysis within 24 hours.

Your prompt reply is highly appreciated.

Best regards sincerely!

Michael

Repair and restoration must take some skill!

Repair and restoration must take some skill!

Check out these pipe molds china images:

Repair and restoration must take some skill!
pipe molds china
Image by shankar s.
Lucky this excavated terracotta statue is more or less intact. But still, careful removal, moving to the repair station and the subsequnt restoration must take some skill and patience! The terracotta army figures were made by government labourers and local craftsmen in various workshops by using local materials. Heads, arms, legs, and torsos were created separately and then assembled by luting the pieces together. (luting= use of liquid clay or cement to glue pieces together). When completed, the terracotta figures were placed in the pits in precise military formation according to rank and duty. The faces of the terracotta figures were created using moulds, and at least ten face molds may have been used. Clay was then added after assembly to provide individual facial features to make each figure appear different. So there goes the theory by some cynics that the emperor murdered all his men and had faces made to resemble them! It is believed that the warriors’ legs were made in much the same way that terracotta drainage pipes were manufactured at the time. This would classify the process as assembly line production, with specific parts manufactured and assembled after being fired, as opposed to crafting one solid piece and subsequently firing it. In those times of tight imperial control, each workshop was required to inscribe its name on items produced to ensure quality control. This has aided modern historians in verifying which workshops were commandeered to make tiles and other mundane items for the terracotta army. (Xi’an, Shaanxi, China, May 2017)

Image from page 159 of “Illustrated catalogue of a remarkable collection of antique Chinese porcelains, pottery, jades, screens, paintings on glass, rugs, carpets and many other objects of art and antiquity, formed by Mr. A. W. Bahr, the well-known connoi
pipe molds china
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Identifier: liu-31289009872120
Title: Illustrated catalogue of a remarkable collection of antique Chinese porcelains, pottery, jades, screens, paintings on glass, rugs, carpets and many other objects of art and antiquity, formed by Mr. A. W. Bahr, the well-known connoisseur and authority on the ancient arts of China [electronic resource] : to be sold at unrestricted public sale at the American Art Galleries, Madison Square South, on the afternoons herein stated
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: American Art Association Bahr, A. W Kirby, Thomas E. (Thomas Ellis), 1846-1924 Bernet, Otto American Art Galleries
Subjects: Bahr, A. W
Publisher: New York : American Art Association
Contributing Library: William Randolph Hearst Archive, Long Island University
Digitizing Sponsor: Metropolitan New York Library Council METRO

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rple shade, used predominantly forrobes, which have a turquoise-blue edging. Dee]) .Minggreens are used for lower layers of base, with center partand top, and for lower robes, a deep blue-tinted aubergine,yellow used for deer, stork, and details. A fine example ofearly work and in perfect condition. It is a rare exampleof the Cheng Te reign of the Ming dynasty. (Illustrated) Height, 15 inches. 482— I.mi-osixg Figure of a Deity (Ming) The imposing figure of the deity is seated on bench withrectangular pedestal of severe lines and moldings, onehand held Up and other, against girdle. Hard heavy pot-tery. The robe, witli flowing outline, is covered with a deepMing green glaze with malachite tints. Head-dress is of adeep turquoise-blue. Heavy gilding is employed for hands,face, and breast plate, which is ornamented with a dragonand clouds mostly gilt, but with parts of turquoise-blue.Pedestal is green and yellow with traces of red in the fret-work under. Height, 20y, inches.(Illustrated)

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Third Afternoon 483—Large Ma hulk Figere ok God ok Litkratcrk (Sung) Seated on an oblong base with arms folded in contemplativepose, and a benign expression on the face, the folds ofthe robes and the deep feeling of this work show high sculp-tural quality. The surface has been coated with red lac-quer paint and still shows traces of same. //eigh1, 21,-4 incites. 48+—Bronze-green Censer and Cover (Early Ming) Oblong, straight-sided vessel resting on four tubular feetwith cut-ribs at angles, flange at top and curved band-rimhandles. Body is decorated with diaper of small Squareswith round boss in each and archaic lined-border and largekey pattern medallions. Cover is deeply recessed, hasfloral ornament, and on top, a vigorously-molded Dog ofFo, with paw on ball of brocade. Imitation of ancientbronze sacrificial vessel. Soft pipe-clay pottery coveredwith a light bronze-green glaze of various shades, showingeffect of time in color of burnt-clay. Imitations of incrusta-tions of verdigr

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Image from page 488 of “The fireside university of modern invention, discovery, industry and art for home circle study and entertainment” (1902)
pipe molds china
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Identifier: firesideuniversi01mcgo
Title: The fireside university of modern invention, discovery, industry and art for home circle study and entertainment
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: McGovern, John. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Science
Publisher: Chicago, Union pub. house
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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fe-time. How were the Blue Pictures put on ? By a set of artists, each making a different part of the picture,owing to the influences of caste and unionism in the trades.When the Chinese began to paint pictures to please theEuropeans, the effects were still more grotesque, as all the badfeatures of the bad European engravings which furnished theoriginal copies were faithfully reproduced. Describe, briefly the entire Chinese Process ? With a quantity of the Kao-lin the Chinese potter throws his vessel on the wheel, using such molds as may be useful, andsuch hard instruments as will shorten his labors. The article isthen set to dry. The painters now apply their blue figures andlandscape. The slip fluid is now blown on with a pipe, as theChinaman loves to spray things, or the article is dipped. As we CHINA. have shown, it is with the fineness and purity of this slip thatthe Chinaman charges his famous patience. He has ground andground in water the heritage left him by the ancestor whose

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Fig. 166. PORCELAIN—THE DIPPING ROOM. memory he so religiously reveres. The new vessel, painted andvarnished with slip, is now packed in a clay box called a sagger inEnglish countries, and the saggers are piled up in the kiln. Thesurrounding of clay in the sagger keeps off the smoke of the 444 THE FIRESIDE UNIVERSITY. firing. The firing goes on for over a day, and the cooling alsogoes forward slowly. Now, if the cup is good, it may be gilded.A band of gold leaf may be laid on the upper outer edge, onsizing, and the cup must be fired a second time, but in a moreopen kiln with less heat. After the cup comes out, the metalband must be polished with a hard stone instrument. Paintingmay be done over the glaze, and much of the early porcelainthat came from China was thus improved by French paint-ers, greatly reducing its present value to collectors. What were the medieval Western Potters doing ? They were making vases and ornamental articles. Famouspotteries existed on the Balearic Isles,

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