Nice Tooling Factory photos

Nice Tooling Factory photos

Some cool tooling factory images:

SLS Core Stage Production Continues for Rocket’s First Flight
tooling factory
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Throughout NASA’s 43-acre rocket factory, the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, engineers are building all five parts of the Space Launch System’s core stage. For the first SLS flight for deep space exploration with NASA’s Orion spacecraft, major structural manufacturing is complete on three parts: the forward skirt, the intertank and the engine section. Test articles, which are structurally similar to flight hardware, and are used to qualify the core stage for flight, are in various stages of production and testing.

“One of the most challenging parts of building the world’s most powerful rocket has been making the largest rocket stage ever manufactured for the first time,” said Steve Doering, the SLS stages manager at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “The 212-foot-tall core stage is a new design made with innovative welding tools and techniques.”

To build the rocket’s fuel tanks, Boeing, the prime contractor for the SLS core stage, is joining some of the thickest parts ever built with self-reacting friction stir welding. NASA and Boeing engineers and materials scientists have scrutinized the weld confidence articles and developed new weld parameters for making the liquid oxygen and hydrogen tanks for the first SLS mission.

Image Credit: NASA/MSFC Michoud image: Judy Guidry

Read more

For more information about the Space Launch System

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Crystal Mill
tooling factory
Image by Road Fun
Definitely a shot from the archive, this was originally a color slide taken when I was a child using a very simple camera. It may have been a Brownie. This and a couple of other slides were found amongst my mom’s belongings and I had them scanned to a CD. Originally in color, I feel this shot works better processed into sepia. At the time I felt the Mill was a very precarious structure but it seems it still stands today. This was not an easy place to visit and required some off roading in a rented Jeep. My father died when I was young and the fishing trip we took to Colorado one summer was the only major father-son event we got to enjoy together. A treasured memory forever.

According to Wikipedia:
The Crystal Mill, or the Old Mill in Crystal, Colorado in the United States, was actually not a mill in the sense of being a factory, but was instead a power generating station.
It did not generate electrical power, but rather used a water turbine to drive an air compressor. The compressed air was then used to power other machinery or tools.
Today it stands as a Colorado icon, and is reputed to be the most photographed site in the state.

Thanks as always for your visits, faves and more! Hope you all have a great Thursday. BTW, today is the Princess’s first day at her new preschool so there is excitement in the air 🙂

Image from page 250 of “New life currents in China” (1919)

Image from page 250 of “New life currents in China” (1919)

Some cool china plastic mold images:

Image from page 250 of “New life currents in China” (1919)
china plastic mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: newlifecurrentsi00game
Title: New life currents in China
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Gamewell, Mary Louise Ninde, 1858-1947
Subjects: Missions — China China
Publisher: New York : Missionary Education Movement of the United States and Canada
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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missionaries, though they may have lived long inChina, may understand the people well, and speakthe language fluently, are in the end still—foreigners. The Development of a Chinese Church The Conquering Church in China, I havecalled this chapter because that is the churchsmission and character, conquering and to conquer.It has many elements of strength; it has somedefects. But the church is young and because it isyoung it is plastic. God grant that in these criticaltimes, when, as a Chinese scholar expressed it, The atmosphere is aquiver with the spirit ofchange, the church may be set in the right mold I The trend of the church is more and more awayfrom foreign control and toward an independentorganization, self-supporting and self-governing.This is not because of a dislike for foreigners, butit springs from a conviction that the time has nowcome when the Chinese are in a position to moveforward and assume larger leadership. The callis for an indigenous church, not one imported; for

Text Appearing After Image:
A group of the clergy at the consecration of Bishop Tsae SengSing of the Anglican Church. This first Chinese bishop is theson of a clergyman and the father of three missionaries. THE CONQUERING CHURCH IN CHINA 205 a religious life adapted to the psychology of theFar East. Dr. C. Y. Cheng, Chinese Secretary ofthe China Continuation Committee, splendidlyvoiced the general thought in a paper he read lastsummer at a missionary conference. Christianityin China, he said, will become Chinese Chris-tianity. We are to present Jesus Christ to thepeople not as a Jewish Messiah, or a EuropeanChrist, but as a real Chinese Savior. There are in China a few congregations, of com-paratively recent date, known as the ChineseChristian Church. Some speak of them as the Independent Church. The Chinese say thisname is misleading inasmuch as foreigners are wel-comed in the councils of these churches in anadvisory capacity. Nor do they like another termsometimes used, the National Church, for as theleaders e

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Nice China Mould photos

Nice China Mould photos

Check out these china mould images:

NYC – Metropolitan Museum of Art: Armor for Man and Horse
china mould
Image by wallyg
Armors for Man and Horse
Etched steel
Wolfgang Grosschedel (record 1517-1562)
German (Landshut), man’s armor around 1535, horse armor date 1554

Wolfgang Grosschedel was the most famous Landshut armorer of his generation. Included among his patrons were the Holy Roman Emperor and Philip II of Spain. These armors for man and horse constitute superb examples of Grosschedel’s work from different periods in his career.

The man’s armor, dating from about 1535, is stamped with Grosschedel’s personal mark and that of LAndshut. The etched decoration includes human figures and ornaments copied from engravings by the German printmaker Barthel Beham.

The horse armor, dated 1554, is complete and homogenous and though unmarked can be attributed to Grosschedel on stylistic grounds.

**

The collection of armor, edged weapons, and firearms in The Metropolitan Museum of Art ranks with those of the other great armories of the world, in Vienna, Madrid, Dresden, and Paris. It consists of approximately 15,000 objects that range in date from about 400 B.C. to the nineteenth century. Though Western Europe and Japan are the regions most strongly represented–the collection of more than five thousand pieces of Japanese armor and weapons is the finest outside Japan–the geographical range of the collection is extraordinary, with examples from the Near East, the Middle East, India, Central Asia, China, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, and North America. The Arms and Armor Galleries were renovated and reinstalled in 1991 to display to better effect the outstanding collection of armor and weapons of sculptural and ornamental beauty from around the world.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art‘s permanent collection contains more than two million works of art from around the world. It opened its doors on February 20, 1872, housed in a building located at 681 Fifth Avenue in New York City. Under their guidance of John Taylor Johnston and George Palmer Putnam, the Met’s holdings, initially consisting of a Roman stone sarcophagus and 174 mostly European paintings, quickly outgrew the available space. In 1873, occasioned by the Met’s purchase of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot antiquities, the museum decamped from Fifth Avenue and took up residence at the Douglas Mansion on West 14th Street. However, these new accommodations were temporary; after negotiations with the city of New York, the Met acquired land on the east side of Central Park, where it built its permanent home, a red-brick Gothic Revival stone "mausoleum" designed by American architects Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mold. As of 2006, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet, more than 20 times the size of the original 1880 building.

In 2007, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was ranked #17 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1967. The interior was designated in 1977.

National Historic Register #86003556

Ficus pumila L.
china mould
Image by Ahmad Fuad Morad
Kelana Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.

Ficus pumila L. Moraceae. CN: [Malay – Ara jalar], Climbing fig, Creeping fig, Creeping rubberplant, Figvine. Native to China, Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam. Elsewhere cultivated as ornamental. Creeping fig is an enthusiastic climber able to scramble up vertical surfaces 3 and 4 stories tall with the aid of a powerful adhesive. This vine coats surfaces with a tracery of fine stems that are densely covered with small heart shaped leaves that are 1 inch long by about 2 cm wide, they are held closely to the surface creating a mat of foliage that extends barely 2.5 cm from the surface. These are the juvenile leaves. Once the vine has reach the top of its support if will begin to form horizontal branches on which adult foliage is borne. Adult leaves are held alternately in two rows along these branches. They are more leathery than the juveniles, and are dark green, and about 7.6 cm long by 5 cm wide. The fruit is a fig (a sycamore). These are borne only on the horizontal stems, they are pale green in color and about 7.6 cm long by 6.4 cm wide. Most experts warn against allowing the climbing fig to attach itself to your home, garage, or other valuable buildings. This winding vine will peel paint, pop screws, and otherwise wreak havoc on fences, buildings, and any other structure. It can also attract insects and mold that cause costly damage. Very invasive and difficult to eradicate. The seeds and other plant parts are poisonous.

Synonym(s):
Ficus awkeotsang Makino [Ficus pumila var. awkeotsang]
Ficus repens Rottler [Ficus pumila var. pumila]

Ref and suggested reading:
www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?16951
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficus_pumila
www.bitterrootrestoration.com/medicinal-plants/creeping-f…

Protecting the Environment with Bioplastic Injection Molding

Protecting the Environment with Bioplastic Injection Molding

Bio degradable material is the rage in today’s world where scarce resources are depleting fast due to the needs of a growing population. In such a scenario, China bioplastic injection molding has come up with a range of bioplastic injection molding products that have a host of advantages as far as the environment goes. Here is a list of things that make these products eco friendly and a delight to use!

Trees: The green cover or trees are the treasure of this planet. Sadly, we have been depleting and destroying our jungles and green cover in a bid to beautify our homes, create firewood, make buildings and a host of other things. The solution was to create something that would help in curbing the cutting of trees to bring this number down to a bare minimum. With bioplastic injection molding pieces which can be used to create a host of products from containers to furniture, one can actually put an end to the use of such destruction as far as natural reserves are concerned.

Toxicity: These bioplastic injection molding pieces are known to be produced with minimum amount of toxins. What does this mean for the environment? Quite simply, it means that you can actually go ahead and see it as an extension of nature because these products will not harm the nature by emitting toxins that one finds in ordinary plastic. You can use bioplastic containers to bury planters into the ground with saplings that will later sprout into trees, or you can use them near water bodies and to create trash cans as well, as they do not emit hazardous elements that will harm us or the environment in any way. This makes bioplastic a ‘breathable’ form of plastic.

Packaging: The food packaging industry has benefited greatly from the use of these kinds of products as the safety aspect is well taken care of. The packing and processing industry can easily make use of these bioplastic pieces that will keep food well preserved, safe, fresh and free of any toxins so that you actually end up ingesting something that is good for your health and free of substances that may be carcinogenic.

Switch to products made up of bioplastic injection molding with the techniques used by China biplastic injection molding so that you can actually get an eco friendly lifestyle which provides you with light weight and superior quality products as well!

To get more information kindly visit at our web link – http://www.china-casting.biz/bioplastics.html

For more related source- http://goo.gl/3OHCPe

To get more information kindly visit at our web link – http://www.china-casting.biz/bioplastics.html

For more related source- http://goo.gl/3OHCPe

Cool China Foam Mould images

Cool China Foam Mould images

Some cool china foam mould images:

Image from page 13 of “China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire” (1843)
china foam mould
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: chinainseriesofv3to4allo
Title: China, in a series of views : displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits of that ancient empire
Year: 1843 (1840s)
Authors: Allom, Thomas, 1804-1872 Wright, G. N. (George Newenham), 1790?-1877, editor Fisher, Son, & Co., publisher
Subjects:
Publisher: London, Newgate Street Paris, rue St. Honoré : Fisher, Son, & Co.
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

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Text Appearing Before Image:
-, from the Outer Harbour 56 A Marriage Procession 58 Landing-place at tlie Yuk-shan ……….. 60 Silk Farms at Iloo-chow ………… 61 A Devotee consulting the Sticks of Fate 64 Great Temple at Honan 66 The Emperor Taou-kwang reviewing his Guard? …….. 67

Text Appearing After Image:
4 ^ -^ ^ -^ CHINA. THE WOO-TANG MOUNTAINS. PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI. The wild streams leap with headlong sweep,In their ciirbless course oer the mountain steep :All fresh and strong they foam along,Waking the rocks with their cataract song. The Recluse or the Rock. In the schistose district of the Meilung mountains, that engross the southern part ofKiang-si, the forms of the cliffs and the crags are more varied than art could ever havemade them, and than nature generally does. The goddess, however, in a sportive mood,seems to have moulded the amazingly diversified surface of the Woo-tang rocks, inwhich the Kan-kiang-ho has its source; for, the toppling position of the great mass thatoverhangs the village of Woo-tang and the vale of Nan-kang-foo, is obedient ratherto the strength of adhesion than the laws of gravit). An Alpine grandeur pervadesthe whole mountain chain to the north of the Meilung group; and the Chinese are soentirely devoted to pleasure, so much engrossed by superstition, s

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Nice Tooling Factory photos

Nice Tooling Factory photos

A few nice tooling factory images I found:

Factory
tooling factory
Image by marcovdz
Fralib Elephant tea Factory, Gémenos, France.

Swarovski Crystal Worlds – Kristallwelten Swarovski
tooling factory
Image by Cost3l
Facebook Costel Photography

Daniel Swarovski (October 24, 1862 – January 23, 1956), formerly Daniel Swartz, was born in northern Bohemia (now the Czech Republic). His father was a glass cutter who owned a small glass factory. It was there that a young Swarovski served an apprenticeship, becoming skilled in the art of glass-cutting. In 1892 he patented an electric cutting machine that facilitated the production of crystal glass.
In 1895, Swarovski financier Armand Kosman and Franz Weis founded the Swarovski company, originally known as A. Kosmann, Daniel Swartz & Co., which was later shortened to K.S. & Co. The company established a crystal cutting factory in Wattens, Tyrol (Austria), to take advantage of local hydroelectricity for the energy-intensive grinding processes Daniel Swarovski patented. The Swarovski Crystal range includes crystal glass sculptures and miniatures, jewelry and couture, home decor, and chandeliers.
All sculptures are marked with a logo. The original Swarovski logo was an edelweiss flower, which was replaced by an S.A.L. logo, which was finally replaced with the current swan logo in 1988. To create crystal glass that lets light refract in a rainbow spectrum, Swarovski coats some of its products with special metallic chemical coatings. For example, Aurora Borealis, or "AB", gives the surface a rainbow appearance.[8] Other coatings are named by the company, including Crystal Transmission, Volcano, Aurum, and Dorado. Coatings may be applied to only part of an object; others are coated twice, and thus are designated AB 2X, Dorado 2X etc.
In 2004 Swarovski released Xilion, a copyrighted cut designed to optimise the brilliance of Roses (components with flat backs) and Chatons (diamond cut). The Swarovski Group also includes Tyrolit (makers of abrasive and cutting tools); Swareflex (reflective and luminous road markings); Signity (synthetic and natural gemstones); and Swarovski Optik (optical instruments such as binoculars and rifle scopes).
The company runs a crystal-themed museum, Swarovski Kristallwelten (Crystal Worlds) at its original Wattens site (near Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria). The Crystal Worlds centre is fronted by a glass-covered head, the mouth of which is a fountain. The glass-covered Crystal Worlds houses exhibitions related to, or inspired by, the crystals – but do not include explanations of how the famous designs are made, produced or finished. Swarovski work was recently exhibited at Asia’s Fashion Jewellery & Accessories Fair based on the concept of a single continuous beam of fragmented light travelling through a crystal. (Wikipedia)

factory tools
tooling factory
Image by bloomgal

Image from page 128 of “Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society” (1912)

Image from page 128 of “Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society” (1912)

Some cool pipe mould maker images:

Image from page 128 of “Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society” (1912)
pipe mould maker
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: transactionsofbr35bris
Title: Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. cn
Subjects: Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society
Publisher: Bristol, Eng. : The Society
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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bird in raised ornamentation,the sides of the neck of the vessel being decorated with shortraised loops, and the body covered with a conventionaldesign in low relief. In size the perfect pitcher must havestood at least 14 to 16 in. in height (see illustrations). The Norman potters were certainly very original in theirwork, and the fragments, which are pieced together as far aspossible, show much quaintness in design. I do not remembera vessel in any of the London or provincial museums at allsimilar. Many other fragments were found of early mediaevalpottery, including a darkgreen glazed head forming the mask lip of yet anotherpitcher. It is a curiously boldpiece of moulding and veryecclesiastical in character, forthe head is depicted wearinga tonsure (see illustration). We naturally wonder if theartist – potter modelled thesevessels to order, or if theywere the working of his ownfertile brain ; and also inwhat houses in this Norman town they were in use beforegetting so badly smashed.

Text Appearing After Image:
too < Transactions for the Year 1912. A fragment of a fourteenth or a fifteenth-century inlaidpavement tile, doubtless thrown out from one of the old city•churches, and the following various items, all came to handfrom another rubbish pit:— A seventeenth-century iron stirrup. An iron bullet, ^-in. diameter. Two clay tobacco pipes bearing the initials N.M.on the heels, which is a makers mark not previouslyrecorded. A Gloucester Traders Token, bearing on the obverse : LVKE . NOVRSE . MAIOR . 1657 1 = C. G. (City of Gloucester). A small R the initial of Thomas -Rawlins the engraver, beneath the letters. On the reverse : for . necessary . CHANGE=Armsof the City of Gloucester ; three chevrons betweenten torteaux. The issuer of this token was Mayor of the City in 1644,the same year in which Toby Jordan (one of the messengerswho carried the answer of the citizens to King Charles Iin Tredworth Field, when he summoned the city tosurrender) was Sheriff. Luke Nourse was elected Mayoragain

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Bristol trade directory 1871 – Dress makers & Milliners
pipe mould maker
Image by brizzle born and bred
Millinery and dressmaking constituted the higher end of female employment with the needle; they were "respectable" occupations for young women from middle-class or lower middle-class families. The number of women involved in dressmaking alone in the early 1840s was estimated to be 15,000.

Bristol Dress Makers

Allen Mrs. 55 St. Michael’s hill
Baker M. 54 Bellevue crescent
Ball Miss, Regent street
Beard L. E. 25 Thrissell street
Beer Harriet, 53 Mead street
Bethell Mrs. Redcliff hill
Bruton H. 39 Triangle
Butcher C. 1 Redcross street
Butcher H. and A. 16 Orchard street
Canning Miss M. 35 College street
Cantle Mrs. 2 Lansdown terrace
Carpenter A. 13 College street
Cawless Miss, 28 Trinity street
Chedzoy and Allen, 7 Picton street
Cole Ann, 3 Upper Wells street
Cole Mrs. 10 Alfred place
Coombs Mrs. 39 Park street
Cottle Miss C. 5 Eldon place
Davey M. K. 5 Low. St. Michael’s hill
Davis Mrs. Wells street, Culver street
Davis Mrs. 6 Ellenborough place
Downs Miss C. 45 Woolcott buildings
Ellis Miss. 10 Regent street, Clifton
Ellison Mrs. 6 St. James’s square
Fairbrother Mrs. Tankard’s close
Farrow Miss H. 1 Cotham side
Felton Ann, Lower Castle street
Ferguson M. 4 Alfred place, Kingsdown
Ford Miss, Portland Place
Gallo M. 9 Grove p ace, Redland
Gast 21 South place, New river
Gillard E. 18 Denbigh street
Gitson Mrs. 5 Castle green
Griffin Mrs. 15 Dove street
Gummer Mrs L. 7 Cheltenham bldgs
Hanson Mrs. Kinburn cottage, Belgrave rd
Harper E. Queen’s road
Harrison H. M. 33 Upper Arcade
Harvey Miss, 4 Lower Westfield place
Hay E. Terrell street
Healls Miss, 12 Horfield road
Hillier Elizabeth, Lodge street
Holesgrove Misses, 38 College green
House Mrs. Portwall lane
Howell Miss, Regent street
Hurd Miss C. 1 Waterloo street
Hyatt Mrs R. P. Upper Victoria place
Jolly and Son, 43 College green
Keel Miss, Gloster street, Clifton
Kellaway Mrs G. 12 Oakfield place, Clifton
Kernick Mrs. 27 Triangle
King Mrs J. 30 Clarence place
Lambert Mrs. Elton place
Lang Miss L. H. Portland place
Lawless Miss Harriet, Hampton place
Lewis Miss, 9 Dover place
Lewis Miss, 24 Clifton wood crescent
Michell Sarah, 3 St Andrew’s bldgs
Moody Mrs. 5 York buildings
Moore Miss, 49 Thrissell street
Morgan Miss, 47 Park street
Morgan Miss, St Michael’s hill
Moulding Miss, 12 Stokes croft
Mountsteven A. 22 The Triangle
Newman J. 24 Ninetree hill
Newman Miss, 9 Stanley terrace
Owen and Hathaway, 4 College green
Pain Miss, 24 Paul street, Kingsdown
Parsons J. 50 Bellevue crescent
Penny Miss ll Wellington terrace, Clifton
Phillips Mary Ann, 40 Milk street
Pile Mrs. 19 Osborne terrace, Totterdown
Roberts Miss, 12 Highland place
Rogers Miss, Egerton road
Sellick Miss, 3 Old park hill
Smith the Misses, 7 North street
Sollis E. and A. Lower College green
Sully F. J. Somerset street, Cathay
Spark and Tait, 32 College green
Thomas E. 21 Lower Arcade
Thomas Mary, Whitson street
Thresher Miss, 16 College green
Treadwell Mrs. 50 St. Michael’s hill
Waite Mary Ann, 5 Devonshire terrace
Ward S. and C. 3 Ruysdael place
White Paulina, 5 Somerset crescent
Whitmarsh Mrs. W. 13 Kingsdown parade
Williams Louisa, East Redcliff crescent
Windsor Mrs. 8 Sunderland terrace
Wren Misses, Totterdown

Dressmakers’ Pattern Maker

Williams David, 8 Brunswick place, Hotwells

Milliners

A milliner is a hat maker. This was a very important trade in Victorian times. If you look at Victorian photographs you will find that you rarely see anyone outside without a hat.

In Victorian times ordinary working people got all their clothes locally (or made their own). The dressmakers listed here would have been kept busy.

Adams Louisa, 26 Park street
Adams Mrs. 6 Cumberland street
Allen Misses, 1 Bedford view
Avins Mrs. Oxford street, Totterdown
Bailey Mrs. 3 Ninetree hill
Baker Mrs. 34 The Triangle
Barnes Miss, 20 Thomas street
Bartlett R. C. 58 Redcliff street
Bartley Mrs. 33 Paul street
Bendall Mrs E. George st. Bedminster
Bolwell T. 21 Redcliff street
Bolwell Thomas, 4 Peter street
Bond Mrs. 9 Hampton terrace, Totterdown
Bond Mrs. Lower Clifton hill
Bound E. 1 Union street
Carter Elizabeth, 11 East Redcliff crescent
Choffin Mrs. 35 Upper Arcade
Clarke Alfred, 4 Old King street
Coombs & Morgan, 17 Harford street
Coombs Mrs, 39 Park street
Cooper Elizabeth, 29 Lower Arcade
Davis Mrs, 28 St Michael’s hill
Dimond M. 15 Bedminster causeway
Dowell J. H. 67 West street
Drinkwater and Son, 6 High street
Duck Mrs, 124 Thomas street
Dunn Mrs. Pipe lane, St Augustine’s
Edmonds Mrs. 12 Alfred place
Floyd Mrs. 1 Lower Arcade
Gibbs Mrs. 5 Elton place
Gibson Hannah, 11 Rosemont terrace
Gravell E. 2 Clarence road
Gray and Co. 28 Wine street
Harris Mrs Charles, Denmark house, Wells road
Harvey Miss, 4 Lower Westfield place
Harvey Mrs. 25 Elton place
Hatherley E. & M. 23 Cumberland st
Heall G. 1 John street, Easton
Heard William, 3 Upper Arcade
Hill Miss, 6 Upper Maudlin street
Holesgrove the Misses, 38 College green
Hooper M. A../19 Broadmead
Hooper Miss, Wellillgton place
Houston and Burgess, 28 The Triangle
Howell Mrs R. 9 Spring st. Bedminster
Humphries Miss M. King square avenue
Hutton Mrs. 8 Dover place
Iles Mrs. Egerton road
Jennings Miss, 6 Stoke’s croft
Jolly and Son, 43 College green
Jones A. and M. 3 Claremont buildings
Jones Misses, 25 The Triangle
Kernick Miss, 24 The Triangle
Kittyle Misses, 5 St Michael’s park
Lapworth Miss, Shortgrove, Durdham down
Lasbury S. 3 Orchard st. St. Philip’s
Lee Mrs. Paul street
Lee Mrs. Abbotsham place
Levy Miss, 3 Bridge street
Lilly S. & M. 3 Osborne terrace, Totterdown
Light L. 18 Upper Arcade
Linklater T. 129 Whiteladies road
Lodge J. and Co. .49 Wine street
Loosemoore Misses, 7 Unity street
Lucas Miss, Mansion house avenue
Maggs Mrs. F. 39 Castle street
Maishman A. T. 11 and 12 Wine street
Marshall Mrs. 10 Norfolk street
Martin Miss, Royal Prom. Queen’s rd.
May Miss R. Shortgrove, Durdham down
Meek Mrs. The Triangle, West
Mitchener Mrs. 8 Gloster street
Morgan Miss, 1 St. Michael’s hill
Naish Jane, 1 St. James’s parade
Newman Miss Julia Ann, Ninetree hill
Oxley Mrs. 4 Granby place
Pope Mrs. St Augustine’s place
Prestidge Miss, 30 Montague hill
Richards Mrs. 12 Mall place
Roberts Mrs. 12 Highland place
Rogers Mary, 5 Raglan place
Saunders John Edwin, 17 Castle street
Simpson Miss, 55 Park street
Skewes Mary Ann, 9 Devonshire terrace
Slade Eliza and Ann, Surrey street
Slade Misses, 59 Park st
Smith Mesdames, 7 North street
Smith Misses, 33 Park street
Sowden Miss, 7 Wellington place
Stone Miss E. L. 9 Prince st, St Paul’s
Sullivan Mrs. Anjer’s rd, Totterdown
Sully Miss, 3 Hanmer’s buildings
Summers Mrs M. 83 Redcliff street
Sydenham Mrs J. 112 Wellesley place
Symes Miss, 3 Manor buildings
Tarver Miss, Garibaldi bldgs, Knowle
Taylor J. F. 34 College green
Tennell A. A. Portland street
Tovey M. and F. Stapleton road
Tripp Miss Sarah, 45 Whiteladies road
Turner H. 22 Lower Arcade
Voisey and Healls, 3 Dover place
Wainwright Miss, 10 Orchard street
Wall M. A. 9 St. James’s churchyard
Watson Mrs. 19 Meridian place
Wayland Miss, 19 Lower Arcade
Webb and Thomas, 10 Redcliff hill
Wellington E. 77 Stoke’s croft
Weston Stephen, 34 Wine street
Westbury Mrs. 16 Southampton par.
Willey and Davis, 2 Clifton place, Clifton
Williams Mrs M. 18 Camden terrace
Windsor Mrs. 8 Sunderland terrace
Wyatt Mrs. 16 Paul street, Portland sq
York Mrs. Ann, 12 St. Michael’s hill

Nice Rook Rifle photos

Nice Rook Rifle photos

A few nice rook rifle images I found:

Image from page 11 of “Carolina magazine [serial]” (1921)
rook rifle
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: carolinamagazine1942univ
Title: Carolina magazine [serial]
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Dialectic Society University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Philanthropic Society
Subjects: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies of the University of North Carolina
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

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lder and the mostsubtle propaganda that has come out ofthe months since Pearl Harbor. It hasyouth and vitality, but best of all it isgrounded in humor of the kind thateveryone from the hoariest grandfatherto the gayest, giddiest teenster can un-derstand and enjoy. Without beingforced or obvious or slapstick or acidlysarcastic or brittle, it is the most in-telligent laughter that has come toAmerica since the beginning of the War.See Here, Private Hargrove is funny. Hargrove, formerly feature editor ofthe Charlotte News, is twenty-three.He writes just the way you wish yourson or brother or boy-friend would writeletters from camp. The pages of hisbook are full of all the typicals ofarmy life: the mess sergeant, the kay-pees, the shoe clerk, the days spent gild-ing garbage cans, the confusion of firstrifle drill ( This, he said, is what wehave come to call a rifle. R-i-f-l-e. Itis used for the purpose of shooting. . . .Are there any questions now, PrivateHargrove?). There are always ques-

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tions for Private Hargrove, just ex-actly the same questions that therewould be for any rookie or for any rook-ies dear ma or best girl wonderingwhat happens to her boy after the awfulgoodbye at the station. What happensto Marion Hargrove and to millions ofboys like him is fun to know; in thesedays it is almost duty to know. Not allpeople are endowed with his rich senseof humor, but many people may profitby a dose of it on a subject eternally toogrim: life in an army camp. Just now See Here, Private Hargroveis one of those short, comfortably-sizedbest-sellers that sweep the country oncea year or oftener. It is delightfully easyreading. When we learn about the rou-tine innoculations of a private in theUnited States Army, Private Hargrovetells us: Typhoid cant hold a thumb-screw to the all-time wonder, tetanustoxoid. Two medical attendants pin you to the floor while a third assaults youwith a hypodermic needle that looks likean air pump for zeppelins. You walkaway saying, Well, that was

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Image from page 588 of “Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration” (1893)
rook rifle
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: wildspainrecords00chaprich
Title: Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Chapman, Abel, 1851-1929 Buck, Walter John
Subjects: Hunting — Spain Game and game-birds — Spain
Publisher: London, Gurney and Jackson
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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egvilar; in severe winters only.Many in garden at Jerez in January, 1888. Siskin (Lugano). — Irregular; in winter only. Severalobtained in garden, March 15, 1891. Rook.—Occasional Shocks in winter. Carrion Crow.—Rare ; found a nest with five eggs. Sierra delas Cabras, March 23rd. B. is sure he has seen C. comix whenshooting in winter.* * Corrigendum:—Though we have stated (p. 243) that the Raveubreeds late in Spain, it also does so early, for Mr. Saunders writes us :— At MiUaga it was nesting by mid-February, and near Baza I watcheda, pair feeding their young between 15th and 20th March. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES ON BIRDS. 459 Sandwich Tern.—Obtained on Guadalete in March and Aprilon passage. Gannets and Skuas.—Observed in Straits and Bay ofTrafalgar in winter and early spring. Red-throated Diver.—Several shot in winter. Shearwaters.—In Straits : observed in hundreds off Malagain March. Stonny Petrels.—Common on the coast, and probably breedson some of the rocky islands.

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STORKS NEST OX STRAW-STACK. 461 GLOSSARY. -1 boca lie jarro—At short range.Aholdga—Spanish gorse.Aficionado—An amateur, enthusiast.Alcornoque—Cork-oak.Alforjas—Holsters, saddle-bags.Almuerzo—Breakfast, tif&n.Aljparagatas—Hempen-soled sandals.Anafe—A charcoal cooking-stove.Arendl—Sand-waste, desert.Armajo—Samphire.Arramarjo—Charlock.Arroyo—Stream, watercourse. Bandada—A flock, or pack. Bandolerismo—Brigandage. Barbon, barbudo—Bearded. Barranco—A low chff. Barrio—Quarter of a town, suburb. Batida—A beat, or diive for gaiue. Bebidero—A diinking-place. Boracha—A wine-skin. Borrico—A donkey. Biisne—A gentile—i.e., not a gypsy. Cabestro, or cabresto—Decoy, stalking horse. Cama—Bed, lair of wild beast. Camino—Eoad. Canipo, campina—Country, cultivated land. Cancho—Crag, precipice. Cdntaro—Water-jar. Carabinero—Carbineer, exciseman. Carbonero—Charcoal-burner. Casiiela—Stewing-pan, also the stew. Catre—Tressle-bed, camp-bed.

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